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Welding

FAQ

Questions

Answers

WHAT ARE THE PROGRAM STRENGTHS OR UNIQUE FEATURES? WHAT SETS IT APART FROM OTHER SCHOOLS WITH THIS MAJOR?

There are very few public secondary schools locally, other than Galt High School, where one can go to acquire the technical skills to become successful as a certified welder This means that aspiring welders probably acquire training “on-the job” and through apprenticeship training with the Plumbing and Pipe-fitters unions. American River College also has a program.

What sets CRC apart is probably the fact that Professor Jason Roberts was recently hired to redirect the focus of the program away from low-tech and “hobby” welding (although if hobby welding is what the student wants, they can obtain plenty of skills in the program) to a focus on preparing students for professional certification so that they can obtain the very high paying jobs that this field has to offer. To do this will require time, energy and money, but he has already made great strides in terms of upgrading shop equipment and curriculum. The college has committed to building a new program facility in the future as part of the construction trade building project for which fund raising and planning are underway currently.

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HOW DOES THE PROGRAM LINK COURSEWORK TO INDUSTRY STANDARDS AND WORK TO MEET THEM?

This is a profession that thrives upon certifications so the curriculum is being realigned to prepare students to pass current industry standards.

  • What if any changes are occurring in the workplace that will affect our students and how is the program preparing to meet these challenges? A good example might be the trend toward seismic retrofits to protect structures in the event of an earthquake. In California, this will create a very strong need for welders who understand and meet the current welding earthquake codes. Professor Roberts is preparing his students to meet this demand

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SHOULD I GET AN AA/AS DEGREE OR GET A CERTIFICATE?
  • Does attainment of an AA/AS provide any advantage in entering the workforce over a certificate? At this point, CRC offers only the welding certificate. In terms of the workplace, the industry is more concerned with demonstrated welding ability and professional certifications than degree status. Professor Roberts speaks of the possibility that he will introduce an AS degree in Welding Inspection in addition to the certificate but there is work to be done first in terms of facilities and equipment. Certainly, students would be well advised to study other subjects such as math, English, business and management (especially Construction Management), CAD drafting and other topics that will help them secure “lead” positions in the future.

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WHAT OPPORTUNITIES ARE THERE FOR OBTAINING CREDIT FOR OTHER TRAINING (military, private vocational schools, apprenticeship, etc.) OR SUBSTITUTING WORK EXPERIENCE FOR MAJOR REQUIREMENTS?

If students are certified or demonstrate sufficient skills, they may be able to challenge, substitute or waive certain CRC welding course work. They should work with the Program staff to do so. They may be required to perform a welding test in this process.

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ARE THERE ANY COSTS BEYOND ENROLLMENT FEES AND TEXT BOOKS FOR THINGS SUCH AS UNIFORMS, MATERIAL AND LAB FEES, INSURANCE, TOOLS, ETC.

Currently there are material fees of $5 per class except for certification classes which run $20. Students are strongly encouraged to purchase their own leather aprons, gloves, hoods and shields but we do not let costs discourage someone from the WELD 100 class. Professor Roberts has some loaner protective equipment available.

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WHAT ARE THE INSTRUCTIONAL FACILITIES LIKE?

Recently, many upgrades have been made to improve the instructional environment. Wires and hoses have been rerouted overhead, safety improvements made and many new pieces of equipment such as metal cutters, grinders and band saws and a computer operated plasma cutter have been upgraded. These changes are necessary to teach to certification levels. Future plans include many new welders and even an entirely new structure to house the program.

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WHAT GENERAL SKILL LEVELS AND ATTRIBUTES ARE RECOMMENDED FOR ENTRY-LEVEL COURSEWORK AND TO PROGRESS SATISFACTORILY?

The primary skills needed are high-end spatial skills. Fabrication requires a “good eye” to spot a square joint, etc. Welding students must be able to learn to read from plans and construct from them. The welding student must be fit and flexible enough to move around and weld in uncomfortable positions as well as move heavy materials (this is metal after all).Welding can be hot with sparks flying and hot metal slag falling around and on ones’ body so protective gear will always be worn while welding, grinding and cutting.

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WHAT ARE COMMON ADVISING ISSUES IN THIS PROGRAM THAT COUNSELORS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT?

Counselors should encourage certification training and learn as much as they can about the career potential for skilled welders! Suggest other course-work (design, CAD, Construction Management, math, English, etc.) to increase employability and advancement.

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WHO ARE OUR WELDING STUDENTS?

Currently they range in age and interests especially in the Weld 100 Introduction class. We anticipate a change in student characteristics to coincide with the shift in program emphasis to “fast-track” those with serious career interests. We will probably see a younger group coming from Galt High School and other programs.

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HOW MUCH OF THE INTSTRUCTION IS “HANDS-ON”?

At least sixty percent of the program is “hands-on”. While welding students always want to be in the shop “burning rod”, the lecture components are critical. Students need to be able to understand theoretical topics like metallurgy, and practical skills like welding machine set-up, reading and understanding applicable codes governing different types of welding, learning to read welding symbols and plans and of course, safety in order to hold down work in this field.

It is this dual emphasis on theory and application that separates our “education” in welding from “training” in welding. It provides much more than “how to weld”.

Remember, the goal of this program is to get the students good enough to be employable in a relatively short time. Therefore, the environment is very “work- like” with the professor setting out the tasks to be accomplished and the students working together to accomplish them.

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HOW WELL DO OUR STUDENTS COMPETE WITH THOSE OF OTHER PROGRAMS?

Professor Robert’s welding students attended the 2007 Skills Competition in Riverside in Spring of 2007 and brought home three medals; Gold (first in State) in GMAW, Silver (second in State) in SMAW, and Bronze in OAW. These results were achieved in tough competition with larger more established programs around the State. They speak to the skills and drive of both Professor Roberts and his students.

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ARE THERE ANY SPECIAL CERTIFICATIONS OR LICENSING EXAMS THAT GRADUATES MUST OR CAN TAKE?

Being a welder is all about being certified in different welding processes. Most employers can only employ welders certified for the specific type of welding that they require on a specific job so the more certifications the welder has, the more valuable they become. Think about welding on a medical facility surgical gas system, a nuclear power plant, a chilled water system or underwater and you can begin to see how specialized this field can be. Professor Roberts can do welding testing “in house” within our certification classes. The cost is $20 versus $150 per test if done outside of the class.

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ARE THERE ANY SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS IN THIS PROGRAM?

Yes. The American Welding Society, the AWS, has scholarships that range from $1500 to $2000. Check their site http://www.aws.org/education/

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Cosumnes River College | 8401 Center Parkway, Sacramento, CA 95823 | 916-691-7344 | info@crc.losrios.edu | Copyright © 2014 Los Rios Community College District