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CASSL

Student Retention/Success

Title: A Qualitative Study of Two-to-Four-Year Transfer Practices in California Community Colleges (Executive Summary also available)
Author: Andreea Serban
APA: N/A
Status: Available

This report synthesizes seven case studies of California community colleges with higher-than-expected transfer rates. Each case study is based on a site visit conducted in Spring 2008 by two Center for Student Success researchers to document and investigate the full spectrum of factors, inventions, strategies and practices that each college is implementing to support transfer.

Title: Advancing by Degrees: A Framework for Increasing College Completion
Author: Jeremy Offenstein, Colleen Moore and Nancy Shulock
APA: N/A
Status: Available

Desc: Higher education leaders need to understand what really drives student success. Tracking six-year graduation and annual retention rates isn't enough. By monitoring a set of milestones and on-track indicators – measurable educational achievements and academic and enrollment patterns – institutional leaders can learn which groups of students are making progress and which are not – and why. Data college officials gather in this process can inform changes in policies or practices and help struggling students get the help they need.

Title: Beyond Access: How the First Semester Matters for Community College Students' Aspirations and Persistence
Author: Anne K. Driscoll
APA: N/A
Status: Available

Desc: N/A

Title: Bridging the Gaps to Success: Promising Practices for Promoting Transfer Among Low-Income and First-Generation Students
Author: Chandra Taylor Smith, Abby Miller and C. Adolfo Bermeo
APA:N/A
Status: Available

Desc: N/A

Title: Building a Culture of Evidence for Community College Student Success: Early Progress in the Achieving the Dream Institute (also available: Executive Summary)
Author: Thomas Brock, Davis Jenkins, Todd Ellwein, Jennifer Miller, Susan Gooden, Kasey Martin, Casey MacGregor and Michael Pih
APA: N/A
Status: Available

Desc: Can community colleges make better use of data to improve student outcomes? That's the fundamental idea behind Achieving the Dream: Community Colleges Count, a bold initiative launched in 2003 by Lumina Foundation for Education to help community college students succeed — particularly, low-income students and students of color, who have traditionally faced the most barriers to success. Today, Achieving the Dream includes 82 colleges in 15 states, supported by 15 partner organizations. The initiative's central focus is to help community colleges use what they learn from data on student outcomes to develop new programs and policies — and to generate long-term institutional change. Achieving the Dream provides a way for colleges to engage in thoughtful self-assessment and reflection on how they can serve students better.

Title: College Student Retention: A Primmer
Author: Alan Seidman
APA: N/A
Status: Available

Desc: N/A

Title: Community College Student Success: What Institutional Characteristics Make a Difference?
APA: Thomas Bailey, Juan Carlos Calcagno, Davis Jenkins, Gregory Kienzl and Timothy Leinbach
APA: N/A
Status: Available

Desc: The goal of this study is to determine the institutional characteristics that affect the success of community college students as measured by the individual student probability of completing a certificate or degree or transferring to a baccalaureate institution. While there is extensive research on the institutional determinants of educational outcomes for K-12 education and a growing literature on this topic for baccalaureate institutions, few researchers have attempted to address the issue for community colleges. Using individual level data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88) and institutional level data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), we address two methodological challenges associated with research on community college students: unobserved institutional effects and attendance at multiple institutions. The most consistent results across specifications are the negative relationship between individual success and larger institutional size, and the proportion of part-time faculty and minority students.

Title: Effects of Learning Skills Interventions on Student Learning: A Meta-Analysis
Author: John Hattie, John Biggs and Nola Purdie
APA: N/A
Status: Available

Desc: The aim of this review is to identify features of study skills interventions that are likely to lead to success. Via a meta-analysis we examine 51 studies in which interventions aimed to enhance student learning by improving student use of either one or a combination of learning or study skills. Such interventions typically focused on task-related skills, self-management of learning, or affective components such as motivation and self-concept. Using the SOLO model (Biggs & Collis, 1982), we categorized the interventions (a) into four hierarchical levels of structural complexity and (b) as either near or far in terms of transfer. The results support the notion of situated cognition, whereby it is recommended that training other than for simple mnemonic performance should be in context, use tasks within the same domain as the target content, and promote a high degree of learner activity and metacognitive awareness.

Title: First Things First: Developing Academic Competence in the First Year of College
Author: Robert D. Reason, Patrick T. Terenzini and Robert J. Domingo
APA: N/A
Status: Available

Desc: Perhaps two-thirds of the gains students make in knowledge and cognitive skill development occur in the first 2 years of college (Pascarella, E. T., and Terenzini, P. T. (2005). How college affects students Vol. 2. A third decade of research. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass). A significant proportion of the students entering America's colleges and universities, however, never make it to their second year at the institution where they began. This study, part of a national effort to transform how colleges and universities think about, package, and present their first year of college, is based on data from nearly 6,700 students and 5,000 faculty members on 30 campuses nationwide. The study identifies the individual, organizational, environmental, programmatic, and policy factors that individually and collectively shape students' development of academic competence in their first year of college.

Title: Increasing the College Preparedness of At-Risk Students
Author: Alberto F. Cabrera, Regina Deil-Amen, Radhika Prabhu, Patrick T. Terenzini, Chul Lee and Robert E. Franklin, Jr.
APA: N/A
Status: Available

Desc: N/A

Title: Involvement, Development and Retention: Theoretical Foundations and Potential Extensions for Adult Community College Students
Author: Christopher Chaves
APA: Community College Review, Volume 34, Number 2, October 2006
Status: Available

Desc: The aim of this article is to orient those interested in adult community college student research to a wide array of discourses and theoretical tools that can help us understand the underlying complexity of the problems faces by this often-marginalized group. Reviewed are categories of theory about student involvement and engagement, student development, and adult learning that should inform how we educate adult community college students. This article concludes with a discussion of how all these theories, taken together, can improve adult education in community colleges.

Title: Practices with Promise: A Collection of Working Solutions for College Opportunity (Executive Summary also available)
Author: The Campaign for College Opportunity
APA: N/A
Status: Available

Desc: N/A

Title: Predictors of First-Year Student Retention in the Community College
Author: David S. Fike and Renea Fike
APA: N/a
Status: Available

Desc: This study analyzed predictors of fall-to-spring and fall-to-fall retention for 9,200 first-time-in-college students who enrolled in a community college over a four-year period. Findings highlight the impact of developmental education programs and internet-based courses on student persistence. Additional predictors include financial aid, parents' education, the number of semester hours enrolled in and dropped during the first fall semester, and participation in the Student Support Services program.

Title: Promising Practices for Community College Developmental Education
Author: Wendy Schwartz and Davis Jenkins
APA: N/A
Status: Available

Desc: N/A

Title: Taking the Next Step: The Promise of Intermediate Measures for Meeting Postsecondary Completion Goals
Author: Jeremy Offenstein and Nancy Shulock
APA: N/A
Status: Available

Desc: N/A

Title: Technology Solutions for Developmental Math: An Overview of Current and Emerging Practices
Author: Rhonda M. Epper and Elaine DeLott Baker
APA: N/A
Status: Available

Desc: N/A

Title: What Matters to Student Success: A Review of the Literature
Author: George D. Kuh, Jillian Kinzie, Jennifer A. Buckley, Brian K. Bridges and John C. Hayek
APA: N/A
Status: Available

N/A

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