Catalog 2019-20

Biology

Associate Degrees for Transfer

A.S.-T. in Biology

The Associate in Science in Biology for Transfer Degree is designed to prepare students for a seamless transfer into the CSU system to complete a baccalaureate degree in Biology or a similar major. Students with this degree will receive priority admission with junior status to the California State University system. The Associate in Science in Nutrition and Dietetics for Transfer is comprised of lower division coursework typically required by CSU institutions. Students must complete the following Associate Degree for Transfer requirements (Pursuant to SB1440, §66746):

  • Completion of 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for transfer to the California State University.
  • The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) pattern.
  • A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college district.
  • Obtainment of a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
  • A grade of “C” or better in all courses required for the major or area of emphasis.

Completion of the AS-T degree may not prepare students to transfer to University of California biology programs that may have different requirements. If a student intends to transfer to University of California, additional courses in chemistry, physics, and math may be required.

Note to Transfer Students:
The Associate Degree for Transfer program is designed for students who plan to transfer to a campus of the California State University (CSU). Other than the required core, the courses you choose to complete this degree will depend to some extent on the selected CSU for transfer. In addition, some IGETC requirements can also be completed using courses required for this associate degree for transfer major (known as “double-counting”). Meeting with a counselor to determine the most appropriate course choices will facilitate efficient completion of a student’s transfer requirements. For students wishing to transfer to other universities (UC System, private, or out-of-state), the Associate Degree for Transfer may not provide adequate preparation for upper-division transfer admissions, because many universities require more lower division courses than those in this degree. Even the CSU's that accept this transfer degree may likely require additional lower division courses to achieve the Bachelor degree. It is critical that students meet with a CRC counselor to select and plan the courses for the major, as programs vary widely in terms of the required preparation.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology 5
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany 5
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology 5
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I 5
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II 5
MATH 350 Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences I  (3) 3 - 5
  or MATH 400 Calculus I  (5)
PHYS 350 General Physics 4
PHYS 360 General Physics 4
Total Units: 36 - 38

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

<p>DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESSES OF SCIENCE, THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND ESTABLISHED KNOWLEDGE. </p> <p>This includes the ability to…</p> <ul> <li>Elucidate the way in which research leads to generally accepted conclusions and the integration of new research data with the building of a body of scientific knowledge. </li> <li>Recognize that the information presented in science textbooks and other established “authorities” is the result of research conducted in the field or the lab and is based on an accumulation of data. </li> <li>Design a scientific inquiry, including use of proper controls and analyses </li> <li>Demonstrate critical thinking skills by the analysis of data sets, recognition of the implications of perturbations to biological systems, and synthesis of information to draw conclusions. </li></ul>

EXPRESS ONE'S SELF CLEARLY WHEN WRITING OR SPEAKING ABOUT BIOLOGY, DEMONSTRATING KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC BIOLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY AND UNDERSTANDING OF MAJOR BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS. This includes the ability to produce: Laboratory reports which address background information, procedures, results, and analysis of data developed during a laboratory exercise or inquiry project. Essays explaining biological processes in clear and concise terms. Reports and term papers which clearly explain biological processes and elucidate current theories explaining biological phenomena.

<p>DEMONSTRATE BOTH CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND TEST TAKING SKILLS WHEN COMPLETING ESSAY, OBJECTIVE, AND MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMS. </p> <p>This includes the ability to: </p> <ul> <li>Demonstrate problem-solving abilities in the major content areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution. </li> <li>Analyze the logic of a multiple-choice question about biology and select the correct response from among related items. </li> <li>Write clear responses to essay question prompts without including extraneous information or omitting information necessary to provide a clear answer. </li> <li>Utilize test-taking skills such as critical analysis of information, test-time management and focused writing. </li> <li>Demonstrate content knowledge in the broad areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution.</li> </ul>

<p>CHOOSE AND UTILIZE APPROPRIATE LABORATORY TECHNIQUES PROFICIENTLY. </p> <p>Biology majors' lab techniques include: </p> <ul> <li>Measurement (use of metric measures) </li> <li>Microscopy </li> <li>Pipetting </li> <li>Gel electrophoresis </li> <li>Dissection </li> <li>Basic biochemical techniques such as pH testing, Biuret test, Benedict’s test, etc. </li> <li>Ability to design a laboratory experiment, including the use of adequate controls and choice of analyses used to examine data, etc. Additional laboratory techniques relevant to biology majors can be found in the SLOs for the chemistry and physics courses required for this major. </li></ul>

<p>EVALUATE BIOLOGICAL DATA, DRAW REASONABLE CONCLUSIONS, RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THESE CONCLUSIONS, AND APPLY THESE CONCLUSIONS TO PERSONAL, COMMUNITY, AND SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS. </p> <p>This includes the ability to: </p> <ul> <li>Choose what data to collect in order to address a specific hypothesis. </li> <li>Collect data and keep organized records. </li> <li>Conduct basic graphical and statistical analysis of data. </li> <li>Reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on biological data. </li> <li>Relate, in presentations and/or in written reports, how biological information is relevant to personal and community issues.</li> </ul> Recognize the ethical implications of biological research and the responsibility to use knowledge wisely.

E<p>MPLOY INFORMATION-GATHERING TOOLS TO INVESTIGATE BIOLOGICAL IDEAS. </p> <p>This includes the ability to… </p> <ul> <li>Use the Internet in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found. </li> <li>Use the library in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.</li></ul>

Career Information

Research, Teaching, or Industrial Laboratory Careers in Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Genetics, Wildlife Biology, Marine Biology, Pharmacy, Nutrition, Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary, Optometry, etc. Some career options require more than two years of college study. Classes beyond the associate degree may be required for some career options or to fully prepare students for transfer to a university program.

Associate Degrees

A.S. in Biology: Biological Sciences, Biology Concentration Option

CRC's Biology program offers courses which satisfy general education requirements in Life Sciences, are prerequisites for a degree in Veterinary Technology, Medical Assisting, Health Information Technology, and Environmental Technology, and prepare students for transfer opportunities to four-year programs in biological sciences, nursing, physical therapy, and programs leading to careers in teaching, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, etc.

Highlights of the program include:

  • Extensive laboratory experience
  • Day and evening sections of pre-nursing classes
  • Field Trips
  • A friendly faculty who have studied biology in South America, the Galapagos Islands, Africa and North America
  • A Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) program
  • Field Studies Classes

Field Studies Classes at Cosumnes River College:
Nature is often the best classroom! Come learn outside in Cosumnes River College's field study courses. These classes consist of short classroom sessions followed by extended trips to some of the most unique and beautiful environments in California, including Big Sur, Monterey Bay, Mt. Lassen, Point Reyes, Yosemite, and more! These short term classes are offered by several departments, including Biology, Geography, Geology, Photography, and Physical Education. For more information about specific classes, consult the class schedule or visit the Los Rios Field Study Consortium website at: www.losrios.edu/fieldstudy

Note to Transfer Students:
If you are interested in transferring to a four-year college or university to pursue a bachelor’s degree in this major, it is critical that you meet with a CRC counselor to select and plan the courses for your major. Schools vary widely in terms of the required preparation. The courses that CRC requires for an Associate’s degree in this major may be different from the requirements needed for the Bachelor’s degree. Students planning to continue for a four-year degree should consult the lower division requirements of the transfer program of the university to which they plan to attend.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology 5
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany 5
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology 5
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I 5
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II 5
  [ MATH 350 Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences I  (3) 6 - 10
  and  MATH 351 ] Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences II  (3)
  or [ MATH 400 Calculus I  (5)
  and  MATH 401 ] Calculus II  (5)
  [[ PHYS 350 General Physics  (4) 8 - 121
  and  PHYS 360 ] General Physics  (4) 1
  or [ PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics  (5) 1
  and  PHYS 380 ]] Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics  (5) 1
  or [[ PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids  (4) 1
  and  PHYS 421 ] Electricity and Magnetism  (4) 1
  and  PHYS 431 ] Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics  (4) 1
Total Units: 39 - 47

1It is important to check with a counselor as transfer schools vary widely in terms of the required courses.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESSES OF SCIENCE, THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND ESTABLISHED KNOWLEDGE. This includes the ability to: *Elucidate the way in which research leads to generally accepted conclusions and the integration of new research data with the building of a body of scientific knowledge. * Recognize that the information presented in science textbooks and other established “authorities” is the result of research conducted in the field or the lab and is based on an accumulation of data. *Design a scientific inquiry, including use of proper controls and analyses. *Demonstrate critical thinking skills by the analysis of data sets, recognition of the implications of perturbations to biological systems, and synthesis of information to draw conclusions. (SLO 1)

EXPRESS ONE'S SELF CLEARLY WHEN WRITING OR SPEAKING ABOUT BIOLOGY, DEMONSTRATING KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC BIOLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY AND UNDERSTANDING OF MAJOR BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS. This includes the ability to produce: *Laboratory reports which address background information, procedures, results, and analysis of data developed during a laboratory exercise or inquiry project. *Essays explaining biological processes in clear and concise terms. *Reports and term papers which clearly explain biological processes and elucidate current theories explaining biological phenomena. (SLO 2)

DEMONSTRATE BOTH CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND TEST TAKING SKILLS WHEN COMPLETING ESSAY, OBJECTIVE, AND MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMS. This includes the ability to: *Demonstrate problem-solving abilities in the major content areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution. *Analyze the logic of a multiple-choice question about biology and select the correct response from among related items. *Write clear responses to essay question prompts without including extraneous information or omitting information necessary to provide a clear answer. *Utilize test-taking skills such as critical analysis of information, test-time management and focused writing. *Demonstrate content knowledge in the broad areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution. (SLO 3)

<p>CHOOSE AND UTILIZE APPROPRIATE LABORATORY TECHNIQUES PROFICIENTLY.</p> <p>Biology majors' lab techniques include:</p> <ul> <li>*Measurement (use of metric measures)</li> <li>*Microscopy</li> <li>*Pipetting</li> <li>*Gel electrophoresis</li> <li>*Dissection</li> <li>*Basic biochemical techniques such as pH testing, Biuret test, Benedict’s test, etc.</li> <li>*Ability to design a laboratory experiment, including the use of adequate controls and choice of analyses used to examine data, etc.</li> </ul> Additional laboratory techniques relevant to biology majors can be found in the SLOs for the chemistry and physics courses required for this major. (SLO 4)

<p>EVALUATE BIOLOGICAL DATA, DRAW REASONABLE CONCLUSIONS, RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THESE CONCLUSIONS, AND APPLY THESE CONCLUSIONS TO PERSONAL, COMMUNITY, AND SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS.</p> <p>This includes the ability to:</p> <ul> <li>*Choose what data to collect in order to address a specific hypothesis.</li> <li>*Collect data and keep organized records.</li> <li>*Conduct basic graphical and statistical analysis of data.</li> <li>*Reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on biological data.</li> <li>*Relate, in presentations and/or in written reports, how biological information is relevant to personal and community issues.</li> <li>*Recognize the ethical implications of biological research and the responsibility to use knowledge wisely. (SLO 5)</li> </ul>

EMPLOY INFORMATION-GATHERING TOOLS TO INVESTIGATE BIOLOGICAL IDEAS. This includes the ability to: *Use the Internet in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found. *Use the library in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found. (SLO 6)

Career Information

Research, Teaching, or Industrial Laboratory Careers in Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Genetics, Wildlife Biology, Marine Biology, Pharmacy, Nutrition, etc.

Some career options require more than two years of college study. Classes beyond the associate degree may be required for some career options or to fully prepare students for transfer to a university program.

A.S. in Biology: Pre-Nursing Option

CRC's Biology, Pre-nursing option offers courses which satisfy general education requirements in Life Sciences, are prerequisites for a degree in Veterinary Technology, Medical Assisting, Health Information Technology, and Nursing, and prepare students for transfer opportunities to four-year programs in nursing, physical therapy, and programs leading to careers in allied health fields.

Highlights of the program include:

  • * Extensive laboratory experience
  • * Day and evening sections of pre-nursing classes
  • * A friendly faculty who have studied biology in South America, the Galapagos Islands, Africa and North America
  • * A Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) program

Note: This degree is designed for students intending to transfer to a nursing program at a 4-year college or university. It does not prepare the student for immediate employment as a nurse. Students earning a nursing degree will need to complete several lower division nursing classes after transferring.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
BIOL 440 General Microbiology 41
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology 5
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology 5
  [ CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry  (5) 5 - 10
  and  CHEM 306 ] Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry  (5)
  or  CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry  (5)
NUTRI 300 Nutrition 3
FCS 324 Human Development: A Life Span 3
PSYC 300 General Principles  (3) 3
  or PSYC 320 Social Psychology  (3)
Total Units: 28 - 33

1Note: This degree is designed for students intending to transfer to a nursing program at a 4-year college or university. It does not prepare the student for immediate employment as a nurse. Students earning a nursing degree will need to complete several lower division nursing classes after transferring.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

<p>Demonstrate understanding of the processes of science, the scientific method, and the relationship between scientific research and established knowledge. </p><p>This includes the ability to…</p> <ul> <li>Elucidate the way in which research leads to generally accepted conclusions and the integration of new research data with the building of a body of scientific knowledge.</li> <li>Recognize that the information presented in science textbooks and other established “authorities” is the result of research conducted in the field or the lab and is based on an accumulation of data.</li> <li>Design a scientific inquiry, including use of proper controls and analyses</li> <li>Demonstrate critical thinking skills by the analysis of data sets, recognition of the implications of perturbations to biological systems, and synthesis of information to draw conclusions.</li> </ul>

<p>Express themselves clearly when writing or speaking about biology, demonstrating knowledge of basic biological terminology and understanding of major biological concepts.</p> <p>This includes the ability to produce:</p> <ul> <li>Laboratory reports which address background information, procedures, results, and analysis of data developed during a laboratory exercise or inquiry project</li> <li>Essays explaining biological processes in clear and concise terms</li> <li>Reports and term papers which clearly explain biological processes and elucidate current theories explaining biological phenomena</li> </ul>

<p>Demonstrate both content knowledge and test taking skills when completing essay, objective, and multiple choice exams.</p> <p>This includes the ability to:</p> <ul> <li>Demonstrate problem-solving abilities in the major content areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution.</li> <li>Analyze the logic of a multiple-choice question about biology and select the correct response from among related items.</li> <li>Write clear responses to essay question prompts without including extraneous information or omitting information necessary to provide a clear answer</li> <li>Utilize test-taking skills such as critical analysis of information, test-time management and focused writing</li> <li>Demonstrate content knowledge in the broad areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution.</li> </ul>

<p>Use appropriate laboratory techniques proficiently. </p> <p> Pre-nursing majors lab techniques include:</p> <ul> <li>Measurement (use of metric measures)</li> <li>Microscopy (including histology)</li> <li>Identification of unknown microorganisms</li> <li>Staining of bacteria</li> <li>Use of equipment used to gather physiological data on humans</li> <li>Additional laboratory techniques relevant to pre-nursing majors can be found in the SLOs for the chemistry courses required for this career option.</li> </ul>

<p>Evaluate biological data, draw reasonable conclusions, recognize the ethical implications of these conclusions, and apply these conclusions to personal, community, and scientific problems.</p> <p> This includes the ability to:</p> <ul> <li>Choose what data to collect in order to address a specific hypothesis</li> <li>Collect data and keep organized records</li> <li>Conduct basic graphical and statistical analysis of data</li> <li>Reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on biological data</li> <li>Relate, in presentations and/or in written reports, how biological information is relevant to personal and community issues </li> <li>Recognize the ethical implications of biological research and the responsibility to use knowledge wisely</li> </ul>

<p>Employ information-gathering tools investigate biological ideas.</p> <p> This includes the ability to…</p> <ul> <li>Use the Internet in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.</li> <li>Use the library in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.</li> </ul>

Career Information

Nursing, Physician's Assistant, Physical Therapy, etc. Some career options require more than two years of college study. Classes beyond the associate degree may be required for some career options or to fully prepare students for transfer to a university program.

A.S. in Biology: A.S. Degree

What do antibiotic resistance, hemophilia, DNA fingerprinting, sequoias, cuttlefish, intertidal zones, and global climate change have in common? These are a few examples of the diverse topics that are explored in biology, which is the scientific study of living organisms including their structure, function, evolution, and interactions with other organisms and with the environment.

Highlights of the program include:

  • Extensive hands-on learning approach in laboratory courses that provide students with opportunities to use modern equipment and techniques.
  • Small class sizes taught by enthusiastic biology professors who set high standards but who demonstrate how to achieve those standards.
  • A high level of satisfaction with the education received at CRC is reported by students who transfer to 4-year universities.
  • A Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) program to help students develop academic and leadership skills.

Note to Transfer Students:
This degree is intended to prepare students for transfer to a University of California campus or other four-year institutions. It is critical that you meet with a counselor from your desired transfer institution to select and plan the courses for your major. Some UC programs may require calculus-based (not trigonometry based) physics with lab before graduation. Additionally, some UC programs may require statistics prior to graduation.

Colleges and universities vary widely in their requirements for degrees. The courses that CRC requires for an Associate’s degree may be different from the requirements for a Bachelor’s degree. Therefore, you are strongly encouraged to meet with both a CRC counselor and a counselor from your desired transfer institution in order to understand the lower division requirements for the program at the college or university you plan to attend.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology 5
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany 5
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology 5
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I 5
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II 5
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I 5
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II 5
  [[ MATH 350 Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences I  (3) 6 - 10
  and  MATH 351 ] Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences II  (3)
  or [ MATH 355 Calculus for Biology and Medicine I  (4)
  and  MATH 356 ]] Calculus for Biology and Medicine II  (4)
  or [ MATH 400 Calculus I  (5)
  and  MATH 401 ] Calculus II  (5)
Total Units: 41 - 45

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESSES OF SCIENCE, THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND ESTABLISHED KNOWLEDGE. (PSLO 1)

Elucidate the way in which research leads to generally accepted conclusions and the integration of new research data with the building of a body of scientific knowledge.

Recognize that the information presented in science textbooks and other established “authorities” is the result of research conducted in the field or the lab and is based on an accumulation of data.

Design a scientific inquiry, including use of proper controls and analyses.

Demonstrate critical thinking skills by the analysis of data sets, recognition of the implications of perturbations to biological systems, and synthesis of information to draw conclusions.

EXPRESS ONE'S SELF CLEARLY WHEN WRITING OR SPEAKING ABOUT BIOLOGY, DEMONSTRATING KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC BIOLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY AND UNDERSTANDING OF MAJOR BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS. (PSLO 2)

Produce laboratory reports which address background information, procedures, results, and analysis of data developed during a laboratory exercise or inquiry project.

Produce essays explaining biological processes in clear and concise terms.

Produce reports and term papers which clearly explain biological processes and elucidate current theories explaining biological phenomena.

DEMONSTRATE BOTH CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND TEST TAKING SKILLS WHEN COMPLETING ESSAY, OBJECTIVE, AND MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMS. (PSLO 3)

Demonstrate problem-solving abilities in the major content areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution.

Analyze the logic of a multiple-choice question about biology and select the correct response from among related items.

Write clear responses to essay question prompts without including extraneous information or omitting information necessary to provide a clear answer.

Utilize test-taking skills such as critical analysis of information, test-time management and focused writing.

Demonstrate content knowledge in the broad areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution.

CHOOSE AND UTILIZE APPROPRIATE LABORATORY TECHNIQUES PROFICIENTLY. (PSLO 4)

Demonstrate proficient use of measurement (use of metric measures).

Demonstrate proficient use of microscopy.

Demonstrate proficient use of pipetting.

Demonstrate proficient use of gel electrophoresis.

Demonstrate proficient use of dissection.

Demonstrate proficient use of basic biochemical techniques such as pH testing, Biuret test, Benedict’s test, etc.

Demonstrate the ability to design a laboratory experiment, including the use of adequate controls and choice of analyses used to examine data, etc.

EVALUATE BIOLOGICAL DATA, DRAW REASONABLE CONCLUSIONS, RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THESE CONCLUSIONS, AND APPLY THESE CONCLUSIONS TO PERSONAL, COMMUNITY, AND SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS. (PSLO 5)

Choose what data to collect in order to address a specific hypothesis.

Collect data and keep organized records.

Conduct basic graphical and statistical analysis of data.

Reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on biological data.

Relate, in presentations and/or in written reports, how biological information is relevant to personal and community issues.

Recognize the ethical implications of biological research and the responsibility to use knowledge wisely.

EMPLOY INFORMATION-GATHERING TOOLS TO INVESTIGATE BIOLOGICAL IDEAS. (PSLO 6)

Use the Internet in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.

Use the library in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.

Career Information

Research, Teaching, or Industrial Laboratory Careers in Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Genetics, Wildlife Biology, Marine Biology, Pharmacy, Nutrition, Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary, Optometry, etc. These career options require more than two years of college study. Classes beyond the associate degree may be required for career options or to fully prepare students for transfer to a university program.

A.S. in General Science

Areas of Study include:

  • Physical Anthropology
  • Astronomy
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Engineering
  • Physical Geography
  • Geology
  • Physics

Eighteen (18) units of transfer level course work in science is required. Two laboratory courses must be included: one in the physical sciences and one in the biological sciences. Courses may be selected from astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, physical geography, physical anthropology, and physics. The student, in consultation with a counselor, should choose science courses to meet his or her program, transfer, or general education requirements.

Students interested in transferring to a four-year university with a science major are encouraged to complete a science AS or AS-T degree such as Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Geography, Geology, or Physics. This General Science degree may not include the majors-level transfer courses needed for many science majors. Students are strongly recommended to see a counselor for guidance.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
A minimum of 4 units from the following: 4
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology  (3)
  and ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory  (1)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms  (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology  (4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology  (5)
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany  (5)
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology  (5)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 440 General Microbiology  (4)
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory  (1)
  and ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy  (3)
CHEM 300 Beginning Chemistry  (4)
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 306 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  (1)
  and CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry  (3)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II  (5)
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II  (5)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems  (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOL 305 Earth Science  (3)
GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOL 310 Historical Geology  (3)
ENGR 304 How Things Work  (3)
PHYS 350 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 360 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics  (5)
PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics  (5)
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids  (4)
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism  (4)
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics  (4)
A minimum of 11 units from the following: 111
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology  (3)
ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory  (1)
ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy  (3)
ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory  (1)
BIOL 300 The Foundations of Biology  (3)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms  (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology  (4)
BIOL 342 The New Plagues: New and Ancient Infectious Diseases Threatening World Health  (3)
BIOL 350 Environmental Biology  (3)
BIOL 352 Conservation Biology  (3)
BIOL 390 Natural History Field Study  (0.5 - 4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology  (5)
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany  (5)
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology  (5)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 440 General Microbiology  (4)
BIOL 462 Genetics in Contemporary Human Society  (3)
CHEM 300 Beginning Chemistry  (4)
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 306 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry  (3)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  (1)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II  (5)
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II  (5)
ENGR 304 How Things Work  (3)
GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems  (3)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory  (1)
GEOG 305 Global Climate Change  (3)
GEOG 306 Weather and Climate  (3)
GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 305 Earth Science  (3)
GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 310 Historical Geology  (3)
GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 330 Introduction to Oceanography  (3)
GEOL 390 Field Studies in Geology  (1 - 4)
PHYS 310 Conceptual Physics  (3)
PHYS 350 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 360 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics  (5)
PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics  (5)
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids  (4)
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism  (4)
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics  (4)
Total Units: 18

1Courses used in A or B above will not count towards C, except units exceeding the 4 or 3 unit minimum in A and B. For example, a student completing the 5 unit CHEM 309 under B could apply 2 of those units towards C. A total of 18 science units is required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

explain the core perspectives of the scientific method and apply it to at least one scientific discipline. (SLO 1)

solve introductory problems of a conceptual and/or numerical nature of at least one scientific discipline. (SLO 2)

accurately apply the basic vocabulary and concepts of at least one scientific discipline verbally and in writing. (SLO 3)

recognize the use and misuse of scientific concepts in society including politics and the media. (SLO 4)

Biology (BIOL) Courses

BIOL 100 Introduction to Concepts of Human Anatomy and Physiology

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

This introductory course provides an overview of the basic anatomy and physiology of all body systems. It is designed as a non-transferable course for the Medical Assisting Programs and other related programs, and may be useful for other health-related technologies and for strengthening or developing a vocabulary in human anatomy and physiology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO 1: EXPLAIN THE BASIC STRUCTURE OF CELLS AND TISSUES AND THE RELEVANCE OF THIS STRUCTURE TO HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

BIOL 102 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology

Units: 4

Hours: 54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

This introductory course provides an overview of the basic anatomy and physiology of all body systems. It is designed as a non-transferable course and meets the minimum requirements for Medical Assisting, Health Information Technology, Emergency Medical Technician, Pharmacy Technology, Licensed Vocational Nursing, and other health-related technologies. It is also useful for strengthening or developing a vocabulary in human anatomy and physiology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO 1: EXPLAIN THE BASIC STRUCTURE OF CELLS AND TISSUES AND THE RELEVANCE OF THIS STRUCTURE TO HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

BIOL 295 Independent Studies in Biology

Units: 1 - 3

Hours: 54 - 162 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).

BIOL 300 The Foundations of Biology

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: ESLR 320 and ESLW 310, OR ESL 325 with a grade of C or better; OR eligibility for ENGRD 310 AND ENGWR 101.

Transferable: CSU; UC (Transfer Credit Limitations: 1) BIOL 300, 307 and 310 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course; 2) No credit for BIOL 300 or 307 if taken after BIOL 400, 420, 430, or 431)

This course is a survey of major topics in the biological sciences for the non-science major with an emphasis on human biology. Units covered include cell structure and chemistry, metabolism, Mendelian and molecular genetics, genetic engineering, anatomy and physiology of humans, evolution, and ecology. Students interested in a general elective biology course are strongly advised to take either BIOL 300, BIOL 307, or BIOL 310 since some transfer institutions will provide credit for only one of the three courses.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO 1: EXPLAIN THE BASIC MECHANISMS BY WHICH ORGANISMS MAINTAIN HOMEOSTASIS

BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms

Units: 4

Hours: 54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: ESLR 320 and ELSW 310, OR ESL 325 with a grade of C or better; OR eligibility for ENGRD 310 AND ENGWR 101.

Transferable: CSU; UC (Transfer Credit Limitations: 1) BIOL 300, 307 and 310 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course; 2) No credit for BIOL 300 or 307 if taken after BIOL 400, 420, 430, or 431)

This is a general biology course focusing on a survey of the plant and animal kingdoms with an emphasis on evolution and biodiversity. The course covers the general principles of biology including: methods of science, cell organization, genetics, evolution, ecology, biodiversity, and anatomy. These principles are explored in more depth through the examination of additional topics which may include: disease and epidemiology, physiological ecology, biotechnology, population growth and regulation, ecosystem ecology, and conservation biology. The course is designed for non-science majors and is especially useful for liberal studies, elementary education, environmental studies, recreation, and similar majors. Students interested in a general elective biology course are strongly advised to take either BIOL 300, BIOL 307, or BIOL 310 since some transfer institutions will provide credit for only one of the three courses.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO 1: ARTICULATE THE IMPORTANCE OF THE DIVERSITY OF ORGANISMS TO ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONING.

BIOL 308 Contemporary Biology

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: ESLR 320 and ESLW 310, OR ESL 325 with a grade of C or better; OR eligibility for ENGRD 310 AND ENGWR 101.

This course is a survey of biological science intended to equip the student to think and act intelligently with respect to contemporary issues in biology. Biological topics are introduced in a framework of natural selection. The course is for those not intending to major in biological sciences, particularly liberal studies majors. Genetics is a significant focus of the course, as are origin of cellular life, cellular physiology, and diversity of organisms. An optional laboratory illustrating these introduced principles is offered as a separate, one-unit course (Biol 309).

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO 1: UTILIZE THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD AND EVALUATE SCIENTIFIC DATA.

BIOL 309 Contemporary Biology Laboratory

Units: 1

Hours: 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Corequisite: BIOL 308; BIOL 308 may be taken during a previous semester. Grade of "C" or better required if taken previously.

Advisory: ESLR 320 and ESLW 310, OR ESL 325 with a grade of C or better; OR eligibility for ENGRD 310 AND ENGWR 101.

This course is an optional laboratory accompaniment to BIOL 308. The sessions will illustrate biological phenomena and their relationship to contemporary concerns and discoveries in biology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO 1: UTILIZE THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD AND EVALUATE SCIENTIFIC DATA.

BIOL 310 General Biology

Units: 4

Hours: 54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: ESLR 320 and ESLW 310, OR ESL 325 with a grade of C or better; OR eligibility for ENGRD 310 AND ENGWR 101.

Transferable: CSU; UC (Transfer Credit Limitations: 1) BIOL 300, 307 and 310 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course; 2) No credit for BIOL 310 if taken after BIOL 400)

This is a survey of biological science with an emphasis on human biology. This course is intended for non-science majors. Topics covered include scientific inquiry, cell structure, transmission and molecular genetics, major organ systems, evolution, and ecology. Major biological principles are explored in each topic, but an emphasis is placed on human issues. The laboratory activities are designed to further investigate and illuminate each topic area. Students interested in a general elective biology course are strongly advised to take either BIOL 300, BIOL 307, or BIOL 310 since some transfer institutions will provide credit for only one of the three courses.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO1:EXPLAIN THE BASIC BIOCHEMICAL, CELLULAR, STRUCTURAL, AND PHYSIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS BY WHICH HUMANS MAINTAIN HOMEOSTASIS.

BIOL 342 The New Plagues: New and Ancient Infectious Diseases Threatening World Health

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: ENGRD 312 and ENGWR 101, or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course will cover general biological concepts and the epidemiology and pathology of selected pathogens such as prions, viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and helminthes threatening public health on a global scale. The course explores the influence of human behavior and activities on the emergence of new infectious agents and the re-emergence of ancient plagues.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: Examine the biology, pathogenesis, and transmission of infectious agents threatening global health.

BIOL 350 Environmental Biology

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: ENGRD 312 and ENGWR 101; or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course provides an overview of ecosystems and natural resources. Major topics covered include ecological principles, ecosystem functioning, conservation biology, resource use and management, pollution and other human-caused environmental impacts. This course provides the background needed to understand major global and regional issues such as acid rain, global warming, hazardous waste disposal, deforestation and endangered species recovery. This course is especially useful for Environmental Science, Ecology, Recreation, and Political Science majors. Field trips, attendance at public meetings and/or a semester project may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1-APPLY THE PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY TO THE ANALYSIS OF INDIVIDUAL ADAPTATION, POPULATIONS, COMMUNITIES, AND ECOSYSTEMS. This includes the ability to...

BIOL 351 Global Climate Change

Units: 3

Same As: GEOG 305

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This interdisciplinary course explores the natural and human factors causing the Earth’s climate to change. Whether alarmed, skeptical, or just curious about climate change, this course will provide the scientific tools to analyze the evidence that climate change is a looming threat. Through lectures, readings, discussions and projects, students will examine the Earth’s present and past climates as well as the influence of climate on the geographical distribution of plants, animals and human societies. This course is the same as GEOG 305, and only one
may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO 1: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PHYSICAL FACTORS AFFECTING CLIMATE AND THE RESULTING GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION OF ENERGY RECEIPT, TEMPERATURE, PRECIPITATION, AND BIOMES.

  • 1. Explain the factors responsible for the latitudinal variation in energy receipt and its affects on global temperature and precipitation patterns.
  • 2. Diagram the global energy balance, accounting for major sources of input and outputs, heat exchange and absorption.
  • 3. Describe the various layers of the atmosphere and explain their role in producing the Greenhouse Effect and anthropogenic global warming.
  • 4. Apply knowledge of meteorology as well as global oceanic circulation to hypothesize how terrestrial and marine biotic communities may be impacted by climate change.
  • BIOL 352 Conservation Biology

    Units: 3

    Hours: 54 hours LEC

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    This introductory course covers biological and ecological principles involved in understanding and analyzing environmental problems and exploring scientifically sound conservation techniques. Major topics include the nature of science, basic principles of ecology, genetics and evolution, patterns of biodiversity and extinction, and the interdependence between humans and our environment. This course places emphasis on scientific processes and methodology and the application of science to conservation issues. Field trips and/or a semester project may be required.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: APPLY BASIC PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY, GENETICS, AND EVOLUTION TO THE ANALYSIS OF CONSERVATION ISSUES. THIS INCLUDES THE ABILITY TO...

    BIOL 390 Natural History Field Study

    Units: 0.5 - 4

    Hours: 3 - 24 hours LEC; 18 - 144 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    This course will study the ecology and natural history covered in the field. Animals, plants and geology will be studied and their interrelationships investigated. The course will be offered in the appropriate area (mountains, desert or seashore and ocean). Assignments, field notes and appropriate exams/quizzes will be an integral part of the course. Lodging or campsites and some camping equipment will be provided. Students must provide their own food and some additional camping equipment. This course is ideal for future teachers, parents, resource management majors and those interested in the biological sciences.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    APPLY BASIC PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY TO OBSERVATIONS IN THE FIELD (SLO #1).

    BIOL 400 Principles of Biology

    Units: 5

    Hours: 54 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: Chem 400 OR Chem 305 with a grade of "C" or better AND Intermediate Algebra (Math 120 or Math 125 with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process)

    Advisory: ESLR 320 and ESLW 320, OR ESL 325 with a grade of “C” or better; OR eligibility for ENGRD 310 AND ENGWR 300.

    Transferable: CSU; UC (1) No credit for BIOL 300 or 307 if taken after BIOL 400, 420, 430, or 431; 2) No credit for BIOL 310 if taken after BIOL 400; 3) No transfer credit for BIOL 462, if taken after BIOL 400)

    CID: C-ID BIOL 190; Part of C-ID BIOL 135S

    This course introduces universal biological principles, including biological molecules, enzymes, cell structure and function, biochemistry, Mendelian and molecular genetics, ecology and evolution. BIOL 400 is recommended for science majors and students in pre-professional programs.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: DEMONSTRATE ABILITY TO ACQUIRE, SYNTHESIZE, EVALUATE AND PRESENT INFORMATION IN BIOLOGY.

    BIOL 410 Principles of Botany

    Units: 5

    Hours: 54 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: BIOL 400 with a grade of "C" or better

    Advisory: ESLR 320 and ESLW 320, OR ESL 325 with a grade of “C” or better; OR eligibility for ENGRD 310 AND ENGWR 300.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    CID: C-ID BIOL 155; Part of C-ID BIOL 130S; Part of C-ID BIOL 135S

    This course is an introduction to the diversity, classification, life cycles, and evolutionary trends of plants, fungi, algae, and cyanobacteria. Emphasis is on the anatomy, morphology, physiology, development, evolution, and ecology of plants. A field trip may be required.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    APPLY SCIENTIFIC METHOD TO TEST HYPOTHESES AND EXPLAIN BOTANICAL PHENOMENA. (SLO 1)

    BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology

    Units: 5

    Hours: 54 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: BIOL 400 with a grade of "C" or better

    Advisory: ESLR 320 and ESLW 320, OR ESL 325 with a grade of “C” or better; OR eligibility for ENGRD 310 AND ENGWR 300.

    Transferable: CSU; UC (1) No credit for BIOL 300 and 307 if taken after BIOL 400, 420, 430, or 431 )

    CID: C-ID BIOL 150; Part of C-ID BIOL 130S; Part of C-ID BIOL 135S

    This course is an introduction to zoology with particular emphasis on comparative anatomy and physiology of vertebrates and invertebrates. The basic principles of evolution, taxonomy, embryology, morphology, physiology, behavior and ecology will be covered. A field trip may be required.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: DEMONSTRATE ABILITY TO ACQUIRE, SYNTHESIZE, EVALUATE, AND PRESENT INFORMATION IN ZOOLOGY.

    BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology

    Units: 5

    Hours: 54 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: CHEM 305, 309, or 400 with a grade of "C" or better

    Transferable: CSU; UC (Transfer Credit Limitations: No credit for BIOL 300 and 307 if taken after BIOL 400, 420, 430, or 431)

    CID: Part of C-ID BIOL 115S

    This is an introductory course in which the basic principles of human anatomy and physiology are presented in an integrated fashion. This course covers anatomical terminology, basic organic chemistry, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Both BIOL 430 and BIOL 431 must be taken to study all of the major body systems.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: EXPLAIN THE BASIC STRUCTURE OF CELLS AND TISSUES AND THE RELEVANCE OF THIS STRUCTURE TO HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

    BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology

    Units: 5

    Hours: 54 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: BIOL 430 with a grade of "C" or better

    Transferable: CSU; UC (1) BIOL 300, 307 and 310 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course; no credit for BIOL 300 and 307 if taken after BIOL 400, 420, 430, or 431)

    CID: Part of C-ID BIOL 115S

    This is an introductory course in which the basic principles of human anatomy and physiology are presented in an integrated fashion. This course covers the cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic/immune, digestive, urinary, endocrine and reproductive systems. Both BIOL 430 and BIOL 431 must be taken to study all of the major organ systems.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: ANALYZE VARIOUS CONTROL SYSTEMS UTILIZING THE CONCEPT OF HOMEOSTASIS

    BIOL 439 Human Cadaver Dissection

    Units: 1

    Hours: 12 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Advisory: BIOL 420 or 430 with a grade of "C" or better

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    The Human Cadaver Dissection course is a one-unit, intensive course for nursing, medical, physical therapy, sonography, chiropractic, or other health-related majors. Using a regional approach, students will study the structure of the human body through the dissection of cadavers. Students will gain experience in dissection techniques, more fully understand relationships between organs, and discuss physiological concepts as they pertain to anatomy. Maintaining a detailed lab notebook is an integral part of the course. This course may be taken one time for credit.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: DEVELOP DISSECTION TECHNIQUES

    BIOL 440 General Microbiology

    Units: 4

    Hours: 54 hours LEC; 72 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: CHEM 305, 309, or 400 with a grade of "C" or better

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    This course introduces the concepts of microbiology with an emphasis on forms, modes of growth, cell specialization, mutual, commensal and parasitic relationships of bacteria, fungi, molds, protozoans and viruses. Topics will be correlated with medical and health applications to animals and human beings.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO #1—Evaluate the cellular structure and function of microorganisms.

    BIOL 462 Genetics in Contemporary Human Society

    Units: 3

    Hours: 54 hours LEC

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU; UC (Transfer Credit Limitation: No transfer credit for BIOL 462 if taken after BIOL 400)

    This course introduces students to the principles of modern genetics, especially as they apply to human health and society. Rapid advances in scientists' knowledge of what genes are and how they work impact the daily life of people through genetically modified foods, DNA fingerprinting, therapies for human disease and a variety of reproductive technologies. This course includes the study of Mendelian inheritance, the roles of chromosomes and genes in human disease, how genes direct development, the relationship between genes, environment and behavior, and the contribution of genes to human diversity. Ethical, legal and social issues will be explored through class discussions and written reports. This course is primarily intended for non-biology majors; however, biology majors may enjoy the opportunity to explore human genetics in greater depth than is possible in BIOL 400.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: SOLVE GENETICS PROBLEMS BY APPLYING PRINCIPLES OF INHERITANCE.

    BIOL 485 Honors Seminar in Genetics

    Units: 3

    Same As: HONOR 385

    Hours: 54 hours LEC

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    This course offers honors students the opportunity to study, critique, and discuss advanced topics in genetics such as genetically modified foods, whole-genome rapid sequencing, gene therapies for human disease, and a variety of reproductive technologies. Furthermore, this course includes the study of Mendelian inheritance, the roles of chromosomes and genes in human disease, how genes direct development, the relationship between genes, environment and behavior, and the contribution of genes to human diversity. Students will engage with each other to discuss ethical, legal and social issues during class discussions, and analyze scientific literature in written reports. Enrollment is limited to Honors students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course is the same as HONOR 385. This course, under either name, may be taken a total of one time for credit.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: SOLVE GENETICS PROBLEMS BY APPLYING PRINCIPLES OF INHERITANCE.

    BIOL 490 Science Skills and Applications

    Units: 0.5

    Hours: 27 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Corequisite: Current enrollment in a science course (designated by ASTR, BIOL, CHEM, GEOG, GEOL, PHYS, or PS).

    Transferable: CSU

    This course offers individualized instructional modules designed to acquire or improve reading skills in the various science classes--majors, non-majors, and allied health courses. A partial list of skills may include the following: textbook comprehension, principles of learning and retention, note taking, annotating, discipline-based vocabulary, paraphrasing, reading graphics, test taking, and problem solving. Registration is open through the twelfth week of the semester. Credit/ No Credit only.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO #1: Apply strategies to effectively preview science text chapters or other course materials.

    BIOL 495 Independent Studies in Biology

    Units: 1 - 3

    Hours: 54 - 162 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU

    An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).

    BIOL 498 Work Experience in Biology

    Units: 1 - 4

    Hours: 60 - 300 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Enrollment Limitation:

    Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position or job related to career goals in Biology.

    Transferable: CSU

    This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment in their major field of study or advancement within their career. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce; completion of required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. Appropriate level learning objectives are established by the student and the employer. During the semester, the student is required to participate in a weekly orientation and 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. Work Experience may be taken for a total of 16 units when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING AND APPLICATION OF PROFESSIONAL WORKPLACE BEHAVIOR IN A FIELD OF STUDY RELATED ONE’S CAREER.(SLO 1)

    Full-time Faculty

    Eli Carlisle
    Office: SCI 205
    Phone: (916) 691-7039
    E-mail: CarlisE@crc.losrios.edu
    Tamyra Carmona
    Office: SCI 219
    Phone: (916) 691-7905
    E-mail: CarmonT@CRC.losrios.edu
    Charles "Fred" Deneke
    Office: SCI 203
    Phone: (916) 691-7118
    E-mail: denekec@crc.losrios.edu
    Eric Neff
    Office: SCI 218
    Phone: (916) 691-(916) 691-7598
    E-mail: NeffE@crc.losrios.edu
    Julie Oliver
    Office: SCI 220
    Phone: (916) 691-7581
    E-mail: OliverJ@CRC.losrios.edu
    Jason Patterson
    Office: SCI 209
    Phone: (916) 691-7004
    E-mail: PatterJ2@crc.losrios.edu
    Sarah Pollock.
    Sarah Pollock
    Office: SCI 202
    Phone: (916) 691-7219
    E-mail: pollocs@crc.losrios.edu
    Jena Trench
    Jena Trench
    Office: SCI 204
    Phone: (916) 691-7585
    E-mail: TrenchJ@crc.losrios.edu

    Adjunct Faculty

    Mohamed Aly
    Rachel Aptekar
    Todd Drybread
    Vanessa Dunne
    Robert Grahn
    Amy Kaufmann
    Johnathan Nuttall
    Ann Oliver Graybill

    What do Ebola, hemophilia, DNA fingerprinting, sequoias, cuttlefish, intertidal zones, and global climate change have in common? These are a few examples of the diverse topics that are explored in Biology, which is the scientific study of living organisms including their structure, function, evolution, and interactions with other organisms and with the environment. Students who transfer to four-year universities report a very high level of satisfaction with the education they received at CRC.