Catalog 2019-20

Film and Media Studies

Associate Degree

A.A. in Film and Media Studies

Film and Media Studies is designed to develop critical thinking and screenwriting skills while fostering a humanistic and social scientific understanding of the media. Students combine hands-on courses in scriptwriting, with critical studies of the visual media as an art form and social force. This major is particularly encouraged for students who intend to transfer to university film and media programs or pursue careers that demand a high level of visual literacy, analytic and writing skills. The production of digital film and broadcast television are taught through the Radio, Television and Film production program. Highlights include: * State-of-the-art 32-station computer lab for graphics and non-linear editing including Apple's Final Cut Pro, DVD Studio Pro, Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects. * Hand-on courses in film and video production and editing * Screening room with rear screen projector and advanced sound system Note to Transfer Students: If you are interested in transferring to a four-year college or university to pursue a bachelor’s degree in this major, it is critical that you meet with a CRC counselor to select and plan the courses for your major. Schools vary widely in terms of the required preparation. The courses that CRC requires for an Associate’s degree in this major may be different from the requirements needed for the Bachelor’s degree.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
FMS 300 Introduction to Film Studies 3
FMS 305 Film History 3
FMS 320 Film Genre 3
JOUR 310 Mass Media and Society  (3) 3
  or RTVF 300 Mass Media and Society  (3)
RTVF 330 Beginning Single Camera Production 3
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
FMS 310 Basic Screenwriting  (3)
RTVF 362 Digital Non-Linear Video Editing  (3)
Total Units: 18

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

Analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of film and media forms and cultures. (SLO-1)

Recognize, articulate, and judge the visual, verbal, and audio conventions through which images, words, and sounds make meaning in film and media texts. (SLO-2)

Write clear, concise, and well-developed analyses of film and media texts. (SLO-3)

Demonstrate an understanding of the professional, technical, and formal choices that realize, develop, or challenge existing practices and traditions in film. (SLO-4)

Determine what type of information is needed for a research question, problem, or issue and identify, evaluate and effectively apply this information in scholarly or visual projects. (SLO-5)

Articulate the history, development, genre, and movements of the film medium and recognize the contributions of national, minority, diasporic, and subaltern filmmakers. (SLO-6)

Explain the processes, current structure, and ethical norms of American media. (SLO-7)

Evaluate research on and popular claims of the media's social, political, and individual effects. (SLO-8)

Produce videos that demonstrate an understanding of camera coverage, frame composition and mise-en-scene, camera perspective and blocking, editorial rhythm, pace, structure and style. (SLO-9)

Career Information

Career Options Director, Entertainment Writer or Editor, Producer, Screenwriter, Script Supervisor, Story Editor Some career options may require more than two years of college study. Classes beyond the associate degree may be required to fulfill some career options or for preparation for transfer to a university program.

Film and Media Studies (FMS) Courses

FMS 300 Introduction to Film Studies

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course offers an introduction to the film medium with emphasis on aesthetics, theory and methods of critical analysis. Students will examine film as an art form, as a medium for communicating ideas and as a social and cultural force.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

identify, analyze and evaluate the use and role of shots, angles, lighting, color, movement, editing, mise enscene and sound in cinema.

FMS 305 Film History

Units: 3

Same As: RTVF 305

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course is an introduction to the art of motion pictures, using lectures and films. Students will study the history and development of motion pictures and will view, evaluate, and critique landmarks in the art of movie making. This course is the same as RTVF 305 and only one
may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of film and media forms and cultures (SLO-1).

FMS 310 Basic Screenwriting

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: ENGWR 300

Transferable: CSU

This course is a study of the creativity and techniques of screenwriting for short films, feature films, and television. Students will view and analyze exemplary films, participate in writing exercises and workshops, and complete a treatment and master scenes of a full-length project.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

understand and apply the elements of story structure and film narrative.

FMS 320 Film Genre

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course examines the structure, mythology, style, themes and critical theory of one or more film genre, such as the comedy, the thriller and the film noir.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

understand genre theory, genre's relationship to popular culture, its role in fostering ideology and images of gender and ethnicity.

FMS 488 Honors Seminar: Introduction to Critical Theory

Units: 3

Same As: HONOR 350

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course investigates questions of interpretation and representation in film, literature, media, and culture. Students examine contemporary critical and cultural theory, then apply these theories in analyzing a variety of texts from the Shakespearean play to the sciencefiction horror film. Theories introduced include, but are not limited to, semiotics, psychoanalysis, rhetorical criticism, gender theory, and postmodernism. Students intending to transfer into arts, film, literature, humanities, and cultural studies programs will find this course particularly useful in understanding the critical language of the university. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details
about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course is the same as HONOR 350, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1, College Wide SLO – Area 1, and General Education SLO C5a – English Composition). This includes the ability to:

FMS 489 Honors Seminar: The Films of Alfred Hitchcock

Units: 3

Same As: HONOR 352

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This seminar studies the work of Alfred Hitchcock from the perspective of the key concepts in film theory. Students will investigate the films and criticism of one of the greatest and strangest directors, the self-styled master of suspense. This seminar takes a close reading of Hitchcock’s
most important films and the most significant writing on the director’s work. For students interested in film, media, art, literature, and the humanities, the course examines Hitchcock’s visual style, thematic concerns, and directorial techniques, and introduces the major critical
approaches to cinema studies. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course is the same as HONOR 352, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1, College Wide SLO – Area 1, and General Education SLO C5a – English Composition). This includes the ability to:

FMS 495 Independent Studies in Film and Media Studies

Units: 1 - 3

Hours: 54 - 162 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).

Full-time Faculty

Rick Boeck.
Rick Boeck
Office: CVPA 101
Phone: (916) 691-7309
E-mail: boeckr@crc.losrios.edu

Adjunct Faculty

Patti McCarthy

Film and Media Studies is designed to develop critical thinking and screenwriting skills while fostering a humanistic and social scientific understanding of the media. Students combine hands-on courses in scriptwriting, with critical studies of the visual media as an art form and social force. This major is particularly encouraged for students who intend to transfer to university film and media programs or pursue careers that demand a high level of visual literacy, analytic and writing skills. The production of digital film and broadcast television are taught through the Radio, Television and Film Production program.