Catalog 2019-20

Geography

Associate Degrees for Transfer

A.A.-T. in Geography

Geography is the science of place and space. Geographers study the relationships among geographic places, natural systems, society, cultural activities, and the interdependence of all these over space. There are two main branches of geography: human geography and physical geography. Human geography is concerned with the spatial aspects of human existence – how people and their activities are distributed in space, how people use and perceive space, and how people create and sustain the places that make up Earth’s surface. Physical geographers study the physical elements and spatial processes that make up and shape the environment, including energy, air, water, weather, climate, landforms, soils, animals, plants, etc. Many human and physical geographers have skills in cartography and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Geographers also study the linkages between human activity and natural systems. Geographers were, in fact, among the first scientists to sound the alarm that human-induced changes to the environment were beginning to threaten the balance of life itself. Geographers today are active in the study of global warming, desertification, deforestation, loss of biodiversity, groundwater pollution, flooding, and more. The Associate in Arts in Geography for Transfer Degree (AA-T) is designed to provide a seamless transfer pathway for students interested in pursuing a Geography degree in the California State University (CSU) system. The required and elective coursework surveys a broad spectrum of physical geography, human geography, geospatial technologies (e.g. GIS, the Global Positioning System, remote sensing), and related disciplines. The degree is comprised of lower division coursework typically required by CSU institutions. Students must complete a total of 60 transferable semester units with a minimum 2.0 GPA, to include either the California State University General Education Breadth pattern or the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum; students must also earn a grade of C or better in all the courses for the major as described in the Required Program. Upon successful completion of the degree requirements, students will be guaranteed admission to the CSU system with junior status and will not have to repeat lower division coursework. Students are encouraged to meet with a counselor to develop their educational plans as degree options and general education requirements vary for each university.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
Core:
GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems 3
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory 1
GEOG 310 Human Geography: Exploring Earth's Cultural Landscapes 3
Elective List A:
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
GEOG 306 Weather and Climate  (3)
GEOG 320 World Regional Geography  (3)
GEOG 322 Geography of California  (3)
GEOG 331 Exploring Maps and Geographic Technologies  (3)
GEOG 335 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Applications  (3)
GEOG 391 Field Studies in Geography: Mountain Landscapes  (1 - 4)
GEOG 392 Field Studies in Geography: Coastal Landscapes  (1 - 4)
GEOG 393 Field Studies in Geography: Arid Landscapes  (1 - 4)
GEOG 394 Field Studies in Geography: Volcanic Landscapes  (1 - 4)
Elective List B:
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 61
GEOG 302 Environmental Studies & Sustainability  (3)
GEOG 305 Global Climate Change  (3)
ANTH 310 Cultural Anthropology  (3)
GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
POLS 310 Introduction to International Relations  (3)
STAT 300 Introduction to Probability and Statistics  (4)
  or PSYC 330 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences  (3)
  or ECON 310 Economic Statistics  (3)
Total Units: 19

1Students may also substitute courses from Elective List A not already counted toward the degree.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

<b> demonstrate understanding of the global natural and cultural environments and the geographic methods by which they are studied. (PSLO1)</b></p>

<b>compare and contrast the general biophysical and socio-cultural differences and similarities among world regions that operate through time and over space. (PSLO2)</b></p>

<b>evaluate and analyze critical geographic issues facing the world today. (PSLO3)</b></p>

<b>recognize the diversity of peoples, places, and events globally as well as within specific geographic regions. (PSLO4)</b></p>

<b>interpret maps and mapped data utilizing basic map elements, including scales, common coordinate systems, and map symbols. (PSLO5)</b></p>

<b>use a computer effectively to research, map and analyze geographic information. (PSLO6)</b></p>

<b>compare and contrast common geographic technologies such as geographic information systems (GIS) and the global positioning system (GPS). (PSLO7)</b></p>

<b>communicate geographic information effectively in oral, written, and graphic form. (PSLO8)</b></p>

Career Information

The AA-T in Geography provides students with the foundational knowledge necessary for transfer to a 4-year Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree program. Career opportunities for geographers are as varied as the scope of geography itself. Geographers are found throughout the public and private sector, though rarely in positions with the title of "Geographer." When combined with appropriate internships and/or other work experience, a baccalaureate degree in geography is excellent preparation for careers in Natural Resource Management; Environmental Conservation; International Development; Urban and Regional Planning; Education (K-12 through University); Tourism; International Business; Cartography; Climatology; Transportation Planning; Real Estate; International Business; Marketing; Land Surveying; Demography; and many other fields (please contact the program for additional information). Some careers may require additional training.

NOTE TO TRANSFER STUDENTS:
The Associate Degree for Transfer program is designed for students who plan to transfer to a campus of the California State University (CSU). Other than the required core, the courses you choose to complete this degree will depend to some extent on the selected CSU for transfer. In addition, some CSU-GE Breadth or IGETC requirements can also be completed using courses required for this associate degree for transfer major (known as “double-counting”). Meeting with a counselor to determine the most appropriate course choices will facilitate efficient completion of your transfer requirements. For students wishing to transfer to other universities (UC System, private, or out-of-state), the Associate Degree for Transfer may not provide adequate preparation for upper-division transfer admissions; it is critical that you meet with a CRC counselor to select and plan the courses for the major, as programs vary widely in terms of the required preparation. Students planning to transfer to a CSU are strongly advised to take GEOG 331 (Exploring Maps and Geographic Technologies) because it is a required lower-division course at many campuses, including CSU Sacramento.

Associate Degrees

A.S. in Environmental Studies & Sustainability

The Environmental Studies & Sustainability Associate of Science degree is an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary program of study that presents a broad overview of ecological issues from a variety of perspectives in the natural, physical, and social sciences. The coursework examines the interplay between natural and social systems, and the ideological foundations of humankind's attitudes and behaviors with respect to their ever-changing environment. This program is designed to prepare students to research, analyze, and propose solutions to the myriad environmental challenges facing the world today.

This degree is designed to correlate with the lower division courses required to transfer into an Environmental Studies program at many four-year institutions as well as provide broad-based environmental education for transfer in related disciplines.

The disciplines of environmental studies and geography are complementary fields, both focused on aspects of human-environment interaction. This complementarity is reflected in the many 4-year institutions that house combined Geography and Environmental Study programs. Students interested in double-majoring in these two closely-related disciplines, and/or simultaneously earning a Certificate in Geographic Information Systems, are encouraged to examine the required coursework and plan their program of study accordingly.

Students should use PROJECT ASSIST (http://www.assist.org) to research lower division major requirements at the transfer institution of their choice and should also work with the program adviser and a counselor to determine the appropriate transfer coursework.

Students interested in pursuing an Environmental Science major should consult with science faculty and counselors to tailor the specific coursework necessary to transfer to the 4-year institution of their choice.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
Core Courses:
GEOG 302 Environmental Studies & Sustainability 3
BIOL 350 Environmental Biology  (3) 3
  or BIOL 352 Conservation Biology  (3)
ECON 306 Environmental Economics 3
Field/Applied Courses:
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
BIOL 390 Natural History Field Study  (0.5 - 4)
GEOG 391 Field Studies in Geography: Mountain Landscapes  (1 - 4)
GEOG 392 Field Studies in Geography: Coastal Landscapes  (1 - 4)
GEOG 393 Field Studies in Geography: Arid Landscapes  (1 - 4)
GEOG 394 Field Studies in Geography: Volcanic Landscapes  (1 - 4)
GEOL 390 Field Studies in Geology  (1 - 4)
GEOG 331 Exploring Maps and Geographic Technologies  (3)
GEOG 335 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Applications  (3)
Natural Science/Ecology Courses:
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
BIOL 300 The Foundations of Biology  (3)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms  (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology  (4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology  (5)
Chemistry Courses:
A minimum of 4 units from the following: 4
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry  (3)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  (1)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I  (5)
Earth Science Courses:
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems  (3)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory  (1)
GEOG 305 Global Climate Change  (3)
GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory  (1)
Quantitative Courses:
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
ECON 310 Economic Statistics  (3)
PSYC 330 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences  (3)
STAT 300 Introduction to Probability and Statistics  (4)
MATH 350 Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences I  (3)
MATH 400 Calculus I  (5)
Social Science Courses:
ECON 304 Principles of Microeconomics 3
GEOG 310 Human Geography: Exploring Earth's Cultural Landscapes 3
Total Units: 31

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

<b><i>PSLO-1: Articulate an understanding of the natural environment and human societies’ relationship to it. This includes the ability to:</i></b>

1. Communicate effectively about environmental issues and sustainability, correctly utilizing vocabulary while indicating a complex understanding of disciplines in the program.

2. Articulate an awareness of the relevance of environmental studies to the student’s life and wider community at both local and global scales.

3. Recognize the importance of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches to solving environmental problems.<P ...>

<b><i>PSLO-2: Evaluate and analyze environmental processes and human impacts on the natural environment. This includes the ability to:</i></b>

1. Use logical and quantitative reasoning to solve environmental problems.

2. Analyze critical environmental problems facing the world today.

3. Evaluate data and draw reasonable conclusions.

4. Utilize the scientific method.

5. Employ information-gathering tools to investigate environmental ideas.<P ...>

<b><i>PSLO-3: Recognize the ethical dimensions of decisions and actions and engage in the ethical reasoning necessary to be a responsible local and global citizen. This includes the ability to:</i></b>

1. Recognize the ethical implications of research and the responsibility to use knowledge wisely.

2. Articulate the value of understanding environmental systems.<P ...>

<b><i>PSLO-4: Transfer to a 4-year program and further prepare for employment in an environmental career.</i></b>

Career Information

Natural Resource Management; Forestry; Range Management; Park Ranger; Wildlife Biology; Agriculture; Soil and Water Conservation; Land Use Planning; Waste Management; Environmental Education; Environmental Policy And Planning; Environmental Law; Environmental Consulting; Environmental Lobbying; Environmental Planning; Environmental Protection; Environmental Compliance; Environmental Engineering; Air Quality Control; Landscape Architecture; Urban and Regional Planning; Alternative Energy Development; Risk Analysis; Contaminated Lands Reclamation; Research; Consulting

A.S. in General Science

Areas of Study include:

  • Physical Anthropology
  • Astronomy
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Engineering
  • Physical Geography
  • Geology
  • Physics

Eighteen (18) units of transfer level course work in science is required. Two laboratory courses must be included: one in the physical sciences and one in the biological sciences. Courses may be selected from astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, physical geography, physical anthropology, and physics. The student, in consultation with a counselor, should choose science courses to meet his or her program, transfer, or general education requirements.

Students interested in transferring to a four-year university with a science major are encouraged to complete a science AS or AS-T degree such as Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Geography, Geology, or Physics. This General Science degree may not include the majors-level transfer courses needed for many science majors. Students are strongly recommended to see a counselor for guidance.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
A. Life Science with Lab:
A minimum of 4 units from the following: 4
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology  (3)
  and ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory  (1)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms  (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology  (4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology  (5)
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany  (5)
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology  (5)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 440 General Microbiology  (4)
B. Physical Science with Lab:
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory  (1)
  and ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy  (3)
CHEM 300 Beginning Chemistry  (4)
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 306 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  (1)
  and CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry  (3)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II  (5)
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II  (5)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems  (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOL 305 Earth Science  (3)
GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOL 310 Historical Geology  (3)
ENGR 304 How Things Work  (3)
PHYS 350 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 360 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics  (5)
PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics  (5)
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids  (4)
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism  (4)
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics  (4)
C. Additional Science Courses:
A minimum of 11 units from the following: 111
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology  (3)
ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory  (1)
ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy  (3)
ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory  (1)
BIOL 300 The Foundations of Biology  (3)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms  (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology  (4)
BIOL 342 The New Plagues: New and Ancient Infectious Diseases Threatening World Health  (3)
BIOL 350 Environmental Biology  (3)
BIOL 352 Conservation Biology  (3)
BIOL 390 Natural History Field Study  (0.5 - 4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology  (5)
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany  (5)
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology  (5)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 440 General Microbiology  (4)
BIOL 462 Genetics in Contemporary Human Society  (3)
CHEM 300 Beginning Chemistry  (4)
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 306 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry  (3)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  (1)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II  (5)
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II  (5)
ENGR 304 How Things Work  (3)
GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems  (3)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory  (1)
GEOG 305 Global Climate Change  (3)
GEOG 306 Weather and Climate  (3)
GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 305 Earth Science  (3)
GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 310 Historical Geology  (3)
GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 330 Introduction to Oceanography  (3)
GEOL 390 Field Studies in Geology  (1 - 4)
PHYS 310 Conceptual Physics  (3)
PHYS 350 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 360 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics  (5)
PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics  (5)
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids  (4)
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism  (4)
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics  (4)
Total Units: 18

1Courses used in A or B above will not count towards C, except units exceeding the 4 or 3 unit minimum in A and B. For example, a student completing the 5 unit CHEM 309 under B could apply 2 of those units towards C. A total of 18 science units is required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

explain the core perspectives of the scientific method and apply it to at least one scientific discipline. (SLO 1)

solve introductory problems of a conceptual and/or numerical nature of at least one scientific discipline. (SLO 2)

accurately apply the basic vocabulary and concepts of at least one scientific discipline verbally and in writing. (SLO 3)

recognize the use and misuse of scientific concepts in society including politics and the media. (SLO 4)

A.S. in Geography

Geography is the science of place and space. Geographers study the relationships among geographic places, natural systems, society, cultural activities, and the interdependence of all these over space.

There are two main branches of geography: human geography and physical geography. Human geography is concerned with the spatial aspects of human existence – how people and their activities are distributed in space, how people use and perceive space, and how people create and sustain the places that make up Earth’s surface. Physical geographers study the physical elements and spatial processes that make up and shape the environment, including energy, air, water, weather, climate, landforms, soils, animals, plants, etc. Many human and physical geographers have skills in cartography and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

Geographers also study the linkages between human activity and natural systems. Geographers were, in fact, among the first scientists to sound the alarm that human-induced changes to the environment were beginning to threaten the balance of life itself. Geographers today are active in the study of global warming, desertification, deforestation, loss of biodiversity, groundwater pollution, flooding, and more.

The CRC Geography program offers courses that satisfy lower division General Education requirements in both the physical and social sciences. In addition, the program offers an Associate Degree in Geography that provides students with a solid foundation in geography as well as the standard prerequisites for upper-division coursework leading to the baccalaureate degree. Students may also earn a certificate in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students planning to transfer to a four-year school with a major in Geography should consult the lower division requirements at the university they plan to attend.

Note to Transfer Students: If you are interested in transferring to a four-year college or university to pursue a bachelor’s degree in this major, it is critical that you meet with a CRC counselor to select and plan the courses for your major. Schools vary widely in terms of the required preparation. The courses that CRC requires for an Associate’s degree in this major may be different from the requirements needed for the Bachelor’s degree.

Highlights include:

  • Comprehensive course offerings including a Physical Laboratory as well as specialized training in Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
  • Program’s students have won top awards at state-level competitions annually since 1999
  • Field study courses to Yosemite, Pt. Reyes, Monterey/Big Sur, Tahoe, and the Eastern Sierra
  • Internships available with State of California, County of Sacramento, and Federal Land Management Agencies
  • Three courses fulfill the CRC and CSU multicultural requirement
  • Day, evening, and online sections

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
Fall or Spring semester:
GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems 31
Fall or Spring semester (best if concurrent with GEOG 300):
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory 1
Fall or Spring semester:
GEOG 310 Human Geography: Exploring Earth's Cultural Landscapes 3
Fall Semester:
GEOG 331 Exploring Maps and Geographic Technologies  (3) 3
Check with departments for scheduled offering:
PSYC 330 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences  (3) 3 - 4
  or STAT 300 Introduction to Probability and Statistics  (4)
  or ECON 310 Economic Statistics  (3)
Check with departments for scheduled offering:
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
ANTH 310 Cultural Anthropology  (3)
BIOL 350 Environmental Biology  (3)
  or BIOL 310 General Biology  (4)
  or BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms  (4)
ECON 304 Principles of Microeconomics  (3)
  or ECON 302 Principles of Macroeconomics  (3)
GEOG 302 Environmental Studies & Sustainability  (3)
GEOG 305 Global Climate Change  (3)
GEOG 306 Weather and Climate  (3)
GEOG 320 World Regional Geography  (3)
GEOG 322 Geography of California  (3)
GEOG 335 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Applications  (3)
GEOG 391 Field Studies in Geography: Mountain Landscapes  (1 - 4)
GEOG 392 Field Studies in Geography: Coastal Landscapes  (1 - 4)
GEOG 393 Field Studies in Geography: Arid Landscapes  (1 - 4)
GEOG 394 Field Studies in Geography: Volcanic Landscapes  (1 - 4)
GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 330 Introduction to Oceanography  (3)
HIST 371 History of the Americas from the 19th Century Wars of Independence to the Present  (3)
  or HIST 370 History of the Americas through the 19th Century Wars of Independence  (3)
  or HIST 360 History of African Civilizations  (3)
  or HIST 308 History of World Civilizations, 1500 to Present  (3)
  or HIST 307 History of World Civilizations to 1500  (3)
HUM 332 American Humanities  (3)
  or HUM 324 Global Islam: Culture and Civilization  (3)
  or HUM 320 Asian Humanities  (3)
PHIL 352 Introduction to World Religions  (3)
POLS 310 Introduction to International Relations  (3)
SOC 300 Introductory Sociology  (3)
Total Units: 19 - 20

1A minimum of 60 units is required for the A.S. degree which includes core courses, electives, and general education (GE) graduation requirements. Geography majors are encouraged to complete additional GE requirements from a list of suggested courses on file in the Geography Department and at the Counseling Center. Students should use PROJECT ASSIST (http://www.assist.org) to research lower division major requirements at the transfer institution of their choice and also work with a counselor to determine the most appropriate transfer coursework.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

<b>SLO#1: demonstrate understanding of the global natural and cultural environments and the geographic methods by which they are studied.</b>

<b>SLO#2: compare and contrast the general biophysical and socio-cultural differences and similarities among world regions that operate through time and over space.</b>

<b>SLO#3: evaluate and analyze critical geographic issues facing the world today.</b>

<b>SLO#4: recognize the diversity of peoples, places, and events globally as well as within specific geographic regions.</b>

<b>SLO#5: interpret maps and mapped data utilizing basic map elements, including scales, common coordinate systems, and map symbols.</b>

<b>SLO#6: use a computer effectively to research, map and analyze geographic information.</b>

<b>SLO#7: compare and contrast common geographic technologies such as geographic information systems (GIS) and the global positioning system (GPS).</b>

<b>SLO#8: communicate geographic information effectively in oral, written, and graphic form.</b>

Career Information

Natural Resource Management; Environmental Conservation; International Development; Urban and Regional Planning; Education (K-12 through University); Tourism; Cartographer; Climatologist; Park Ranger; Transportation Specialist; Real Estate Analyst; International Business; Marketing Analyst; Land Surveyor; Research Scientist; Remote Sensing Specialist; Demographer; GIS Analyst; and many more (please contact the program for additional information). Some career options may require more than two years of college study.

Certificates of Achievement

Field Data Mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Certificate

Students interested in research related to field data collection and analysis will need certain skills to correctly find locations in the field, identify locations, map sites, and integrate collected data into a Geographic Information System (GIS) for display and analysis. This interdisciplinary certificate program provides students with the tools needed to collect, map, display, and analyze data collected in a field-based setting and coordinate this with other mapping data and sources.

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GEOG 335 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Applications 3
GEOG 331 Exploring Maps and Geographic Technologies 3
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems  (3)
GEOG 302 Environmental Studies & Sustainability  (3)
GEOG 310 Human Geography: Exploring Earth's Cultural Landscapes  (3)
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology  (3)
ANTH 310 Cultural Anthropology  (3)
ANTH 323 Introduction to Archaeology  (3)
BIOL 350 Environmental Biology  (3)
BIOL 352 Conservation Biology  (3)
GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
Total Units: 12

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE MAJOR MODES OF GEOGRAPHIC INQUIRY.

SLO #2: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF MAPPING CONCEPTS, GIS, AND THE ABILITY TO INTERPRET MAPS AND MAPPED DATA.

SLO #3: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF COMMON GEOGRAPHIC TECHNOLOGIES AND THE ABILITY TO USE THEM TO COLLECT, ANALYZE, AND DISPLAY GEOSPATIAL DATA.

SLO #4: ORGANIZE, MANIPULATE, ANALYZE AND DISPLAY TABULAR DATA INTO SPATIAL VISUALIZATIONS.

SLO #5: EXHIBIT SKILLS LEARNED THROUGH MAPPING AND GIS PROJECT DEVELOPMENT.

Professional Applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Certificate

A geographic information system (GIS) is a database management system that facilitates the collection and the analysis of geographic data from both the physical and cultural environments. This interdisciplinary certificate program is designed to equip students to use this powerful new technology to display, model and analyze spatial data of all types to assist with problem solving and decision making processes. The certificate will be awarded upon completion of the required course sequence and 6 units from one of the listed concentrations.

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
Fundamentals of Geography:
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
GEOG 310 Human Geography: Exploring Earth's Cultural Landscapes  (3)
  or GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems  (3)
GEOG 353 Introduction to the Global Positioning System (GPS) 1
GEOG 331 Exploring Maps and Geographic Technologies 3
GEOG 495 Independent Studies in Geography 1 -31
Subtotal Units: 8 - 10
Agriculture/Horticulture/Plant Science
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
HORT 300 Introduction to Horticulture  (3)
  or PLTS 300 Introduction to Plant Science  (3)
  or AGB 310 Agriculture Computer Applications  (3)
  or AGB 300 Introduction to Agriculture Business  (3)
  or PLTS 310 Soils, Soil Management, and Plant Nutrition  (3)
Agriculture/Horticulture/Plant Science Units: 6
Total Units: 14 - 16
Architecture
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
ADT 310 Architectural Computer-Aided Drawing I  (3)
  or ARCH 320 Architectural Design and Communication I  (3.5)
  or ARCH 300 Introduction to Design Professions  (2)
  or ARCH 325 Architectural Digital Design and Communication I  (3)
Architecture Units: 6
Total Units: 14 - 16
Biological Sciences
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology  (5)
  or BIOL 410 Principles of Botany  (5)
  or BIOL 400 Principles of Biology  (5)
  or BIOL 350 Environmental Biology  (3)
  or BIOL 342 The New Plagues: New and Ancient Infectious Diseases Threatening World Health  (3)
  or BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms  (4)
Biological Sciences Units: 6
Total Units: 14 - 16
Business/Marketing/Real Estate
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
MKT 314 Advertising  (3)
  or MKT 330 Internet Marketing  (3)
  or RE 120 Real Estate Practice  (3)
  or RE 140 Real Estate Appraisal  (3)
  or RE 190 Real Property Management  (3)
  or RE 300 California Real Estate Principles  (3)
  or MKT 300 Principles of Marketing  (3)
  or BUS 350 Small Business Management/Entrepreneurship  (3)
  or BUS 300 Introduction to Business  (3)
Business/Marketing/Real Estate Units: 6
Total Units: 14 - 16
Computer Science
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
CISP 360 Introduction to Structured Programming  (4)
  or CISP 350 Database Programming  (3)
  or CISP 300 Algorithm Design/Problem Solving  (3)
  or CISA 321 Intermediate Database Management  (1)
  or CISA 320 Introduction to Database Management  (1)
Computer Science Units: 6
Total Units: 14 - 16
Earth Science
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
GEOL 330 Introduction to Oceanography  (3)
  or GEOL 305 Earth Science  (3)
  or GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
  or GEOG 322 Geography of California  (3)
  or GEOG 320 World Regional Geography  (3)
  or GEOG 306 Weather and Climate  (3)
Earth Science Units: 6
Total Units: 14 - 16
Public Safety/Fire Technology
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
FT 320 Hazardous Materials  (3)
  or FT 301 Fire Prevention Technology  (3)
  or FT 300 Fire Protection Organization  (3)
Public Safety/Fire Technology Units: 6
Total Units: 14 - 16
Social Science
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
SOC 300 Introductory Sociology  (3)
  or SOC 301 Social Problems  (3)
  or ANTH 310 Cultural Anthropology  (3)
  or ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology  (3)
Social Science Units: 6
Total Units: 14 - 16

1Only one unit required. Independent study unit must be GIS related.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

<b>SLO #1: demonstrate an understanding of GIS technologies, theories and practices.</b>

Describe and assess fundamental aspects of geographic information and scale, with specific reference to raster and vector digital spatial data models used to represent such information.

Compile, compare, and evaluate various types of spatial data, with specific attention to geospatial metadata, data quality, and identification of the most appropriate data type for use in a specific GIS application.

Compare and contrast the variety of available coordinate systems, map projections, and datums, and choose the appropriate variety for a specific GIS application.

Compare and contrast the effectiveness of various GIS output products, including maps, tables, charts, and other digital output for specific applications.

Describe, assess, and compare common map elements and the cartographic design process.

<b>SLO #2: apply GIS technical skills in a professional setting.</b>

Originate, classify, edit, and manage digital spatial data using various techniques (e.g., manual, scan, and on-screen digitizing, computer-assisted drafting, GPS, etc.).

Design, synthesize, validate, optimize, and manage spatial attribute tables and databases.

Apply appropriate data normalization and classification schemes to attribute data.

Formulate geoprocessing and analysis functions that are appropriate for specific applications, and be able to perform and evaluate the results of such processes (such as buffering, overlay, reclassification, address matching, and statistical analysis).

<b>SLO #3: exhibit skills learned via GIS project development.</b>

Synthesize, design, apply, and manage a GIS project, including estimates of time and labor requirements.

Design, create, and disseminate high-quality maps in both hard-copy (paper) and digital (on-screen) form.

List and describe at least three career options for GIS professionals.

<b>SLO #4: cultivate spatial analysis and critical thinking skills for decision-making purposes.</b>

<b>SLO #5: understand how GIS skills are applicable in specific career fields.</b>

Career Information

According to an Environmental Sciences Research Institute survey, over 80 percent of the data used for decision-making in government and industry has a spatial component. New areas of rapid growth are in criminal justice, homeland security, marketing, retail site location, resource allocation, banking, health-care planning, disease control, insurance, real estate, and disaster preparedness, management, and response. Most local, state, and federal government agencies use GIS and maintain a staff of GIS technicians, analysts, and professionals. GIS is also commonly used in the private sector by businesses, planners, architects, foresters, geologists, environmental scientists, archaeologists, real estate professionals, marketers, sociologists, and bankers. The growth in application areas of GIS and of GIS as a specialized discipline represents a new way for individuals, agencies, and businesses to view the world. The expansion of jobs in GIS is anticipated to continue for many years to come. It is likely that all students, regardless of their particular field of interest, will at least be exposed to and probably use a GIS in some capacity in the years ahead.

Some career options may require more than two years of college study.

Sustainability Certificate

This certificate advances student's understanding of the principles of sustainability and sustainable practices with respect to ecosystems, green buildings, business, agriculture, nutrition, natural resource management and conservation, waste management, energy, transportation systems, urban planning and design, and more. Theoretical and practical aspects of sustainability are explored including social, economic, and environmental dimensions.

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GEOG 302 Environmental Studies & Sustainability 3
A minimum of 9 units from the following: 9
ARCH 342 Introduction to Green Buildings  (3)
BIOL 350 Environmental Biology  (3)
BIOL 352 Conservation Biology  (3)
ECON 306 Environmental Economics  (3)
GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems  (3)
GEOG 305 Global Climate Change  (3)
HORT 300 Introduction to Horticulture  (3)
PLTS 310 Soils, Soil Management, and Plant Nutrition  (3)
  or HORT 302 Soils, Soil Management, and Plant Nutrition  (3)
HORT 313 Sustainable Agriculture  (3)
NUTRI 303 Plant-Based Nutrition  (3)
NUTRI 331 Plant-Based Food Principles and Preparation  (3)
Total Units: 12

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

PSLO#1: Communicate effectively about environmental issues and sustainability, utilizing correct vocabulary.

PSLO#2: Articulate an awareness of the relevance of sustainability to the student’s life and wider community at both local and global scales.

PSLO#3: Evaluate and analyze environmental problems facing the world today and propose sustainable solutions.

PSLO#4: Employ information-gathering tools to investigate theoretical and practical aspects of sustainability in the context of energy consumption, transportation systems, food production, water resources, industry, the built environment, and socio-cultural institutions and practices.

Career Information

This certificate prepares students for entry-level sustainability consultant/technician positions in a variety of industries and settings, including private firms, nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, and government agencies at the local, state, and federal levels. Work opportunities for those pursuing additional coursework include positions in environmental economics, sustainable business practices, green building, natural resource management, food systems, energy, transportation, and urban planning.

Geography (GEOG) Courses

GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in GEOG 301 (Physical Geography Lab) is suggested. GEOG 301 meets the UC and CSU transfer requirement for a 1-unit science lab.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID GEOG 110

This course investigates the interrelationships between Earth and humans, with an emphasis on natural systems (solar energy balance, weather and climate, water resources, landforms, natural hazards, vegetation, and soil). Relevant application of these elements to today's world is stressed to help students better understand Earth's physical environment as well as human-environment interaction. A field trip may be required to relate class discussions to the real world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO 1: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE MAJOR MODES OF GEOGRAPHIC INQUIRY AND TOOLS USED FOR GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS.

  • 1. Describe how the scientific method and spatial analysis are used to research topics in physical geography.
  • 2. Demonstrate how to locate places on Earth using the geographic grid (latitude and longitude).
  • 3. Discuss several methods used to collect geographic data as well as several tools used to visualize and analyze this data.
  • 4. Demonstrate the ability to interpret maps and mapped data.
  • GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory

    Units: 1

    Hours: 54 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Corequisite: GEOG 300; GEOG 300 may be taken during a previous semester. Grade of "C" or better required if taken previously.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    CID: C-ID GEOG 111

    This course provides "hands-on" study of the basic principles and concepts involved in understanding Earth's environment systems. Labs feature observation, collection, analysis and display of data related to the study of Earth's energy balance, weather and climate, vegetation, tectonic processes, landforms, and natural hazards. Additionally, labs involve geographic methods and technology, including interpretation of maps and other geographic imagery, weather instrumentation, navigation equipment such as a compass and the Global Positioning System (GPS), and other relevant computer and Internet applications. A field trip may be required.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO#1: Collect, measure, and/or analyze geographic data using common instruments.

    GEOG 302 Environmental Studies & Sustainability

    Units: 3

    Hours: 54 hours LEC

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    This introductory course offers an interdisciplinary perspective on the major environmental problems confronting society and explores solutions directed toward producing a more sustainable future. Course topics include an introduction to environmental issues, and related values, ethics and politics; a primer on Earth system science — the interconnected nature of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere; a global survey of natural resources and exploitation; changing global climates; the world water crisis; the demography of human population, and contrasts between less- and more-developed countries; agricultural and food supply challenges; renewable and nonrenewable energy resources; and land use patterns and related issues. Throughout the course, human impacts on the environment, environmental impacts on human societies, and the sustainability of economies and practices at local, regional, and global scales are investigated. A field trip may be required to relate class discussions to the real world.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO-1: Articulate an understanding of the natural environment and human societies’ relationship to it. This includes the ability to:

    GEOG 305 Global Climate Change

    Units: 3

    Hours: 54 hours LEC

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    This interdisciplinary course explores the natural and human factors causing the Earth’s climate to change. Students will be provided with the scientific tools to analyze evidence that climate change is a looming threat. Through lectures, readings, discussions and projects, students will examine the Earth’s present and past climates as well as the influence of climate on the geographical distribution of plants, animals and human societies.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PHYSICAL FACTORS AFFECTING CLIMATE AND THE RESULTING GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION OF ENERGY RECEIPT, TEMPERATURE, PRECIPITATION, AND BIOMES.

  • 1. Explain the factors responsible for the latitudinal variation in energy receipt and its effects on global temperature and precipitation patterns.
  • 2. Diagram the global energy balance, accounting for major sources of input and outputs, heat exchange and absorption.
  • 3. Describe the various layers of the atmosphere and explain their role in producing the Greenhouse Effect and anthropogenic global warming.
  • 4. Apply knowledge of meteorology as well as global oceanic circulation to hypothesize how terrestrial and marine biotic communities may be impacted by climate change.
  • GEOG 306 Weather and Climate

    Units: 3

    Hours: 54 hours LEC

    Prerequisite: None.

    Advisory: MATH 30, or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    CID: C-ID GEOG 130

    This course is an introduction to atmospheric processes including energy and moisture exchanges, atmospheric pressure, winds, and global circulation. Severe weather conditions such as hurricanes and tornadoes are also studied. World, regional, and local climates are investigated. Student work will include weather observations and analysis of atmospheric data using charts, weather maps and radar and satellite imagery from the Internet and other sources.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO#1: INTERPRET, ANALYZE, AND DISPLAY ATMOSPHERIC DATA.
    1. Demonstrate the ability to graph and/or map atmospheric data and explain its significance.

    GEOG 310 Human Geography: Exploring Earth's Cultural Landscapes

    Units: 3

    Hours: 54 hours LEC

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    CID: C-ID GEOG 120

    This course investigates the diverse patterns of human settlement, development, and movement on earth, which evolved as a result of cultural and environmental factors. Emphasis is placed on understanding global population and migration patterns, language, religion, ethnicity, political and economic systems, development issues, agriculture and urbanization.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO1: Analyze human's role in transforming Earth's surface into a series of distinctive cultural landscapes.
    1. Explain the significance of the major stages of human cultural evolution over time (i.e. agricultural, industrial, medical, and technological revolutions).

    GEOG 320 World Regional Geography

    Units: 3

    Hours: 54 hours LEC

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    CID: C-ID GEOG 125

    This course is a global survey of the world's major geographic realms: their physical environments, cultures and economies; their origins, interactions and global roles. Geographic concepts and ideas are used to study and compare cultures, landscapes, resources, livelihood and land use across Earth. Explanation for the globalization of culture and economy, the widening gap between rich and poor countries, and ethnic diversity in the United States and abroad is stressed throughout the course. A major goal of this course is to improve each student's "mental map of the world."

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO1: Recognize the diversity of peoples, places, and events globally as well as within specific geographic regions.
    1. Generalize the special combination of cultural, physical, historical, economical, and organizational qualities that characterize each of the major geographic regions of the world (such as East Asia, North America, SubSaharan Africa, etc.).

    GEOG 322 Geography of California

    Units: 3

    Hours: 54 hours LEC

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    CID: C-ID GEOG 140

    This course investigates California's physical, cultural, and economic environments, analyzing cardinal changes resulting from both natural and human interaction. The emphasis is on cultural diversity, human alteration of the landscape, and contemporary problems resulting from accelerated competition for natural, financial, and human resources.
    Some field trips may be required.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO #1: demonstrate understanding of California's physical and human environments, their interconnections, and the geographic processes that form and change them.

    GEOG 331 Exploring Maps and Geographic Technologies

    Units: 3

    Hours: 48 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    CID: C-ID GEOG 150

    Maps are the most effective way to communicate spatial information. This course introduces students to the quickly changing world of maps (both hardcopy and digital) and geographic techniques and technologies such as map and aerial photograph interpretation, spreadsheet operations, basic statistics, cartography, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Internet mapping, remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) that aid in data collection, analysis and presentation.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO #1: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE MAJOR MODES OF GEOGRAPHIC INQUIRY.

    GEOG 335 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Applications

    Units: 3

    Hours: 45 hours LEC; 27 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Advisory: CISC 302

    Transferable: CSU

    CID: C-ID GEOG 155

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are computer-based mapping programs that analyze spatial data. This course provides the foundation for using desktop GIS software. A conceptual overview along with hands-on experience will be used to explore basic GIS software functionality. Emphasis will be placed on display characteristics, attribute querying, database exploration and management, spatial analysis, data creation, and cartographic presentation.

    This course is not open to students who have received credit for GEOG 335.1, 335.2, and 335.3.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO #1: demonstrate an understanding of GIS technologies, theories and practices

    GEOG 353 Introduction to the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Units: 1

    Hours: 16 hours LEC; 6 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU

    This course introduces the Global Positioning System (GPS). Topics include basic concepts of GPS including hands-on operation of the technology, real-world applications, computer interfaces, GIS and other mapping software. A field trip may be required.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: Demonstrate competent use of GPS technology and function

    GEOG 390 Field Studies in Geography

    Units: 1 - 4

    Hours: 6 - 24 hours LEC; 36 - 144 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU

    CID: C-ID GEOG 160

    This course involves the study of geographic principles and processes in the field. Course content will vary by destination but may include topics in physical geography (e.g., plant and animal communities, climate and weather, geology and geomorphology, natural hazards, environmental impacts, etc.), human geography (e.g., cultural landscapes, economic activities, transportation issues, land use patterns, etc.), and/or introduction to tools and techniques used for geographic field research (e.g., map and compass use, the Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), etc.). Field trip(s) are required.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: APPLY BASIC PRINCIPLES OF GEOGRAPHY TO OBSERVATIONS IN THE FIELD

    GEOG 391 Field Studies in Geography: Mountain Landscapes

    Units: 1 - 4

    Hours: 6 - 24 hours LEC; 36 - 144 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU

    This course involves the study of geographic principles and processes in mountain environments. The course content will vary by destination but may include topics in physical geography (e.g., plant and animal communities, climate and weather, geology and geomorphology, natural hazards, environmental impacts, etc.), human geography (e.g., cultural landscapes, economic activities, transportation issues, land use patterns, etc.), and introduction to tools and techniques used for geographic field research (e.g., map and compass use, the Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), etc.). Field excursions are required.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: demonstrate skill of gaining and applying learned material in a field experience.

    GEOG 392 Field Studies in Geography: Coastal Landscapes

    Units: 1 - 4

    Hours: 6 - 24 hours LEC; 36 - 144 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU

    CID: C-ID GEOG 160

    This is a field studies course of the geography of coastal landscapes. Physical and cultural processes, characteristics and landscapes will be observed and analyzed. Specific content will vary by geographic region. A field trip is required.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: demonstrate skills of gaining and applying learned material in a field experience.

    GEOG 393 Field Studies in Geography: Arid Landscapes

    Units: 1 - 4

    Hours: 6 - 24 hours LEC; 36 - 144 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU

    This course involves the study of geographic principles and processes in arid environments. The course content will vary by destination but may include topics in physical geography (e.g., plant and animal communities, climate and weather, geology and geomorphology, natural hazards, environmental impacts, etc.), human geography (e.g., cultural landscapes, economic activities, transportation issues, land use patterns, etc.), and introduction to tools and techniques used for geographic field research (e.g., map and compass use, the Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), etc.). Field excursions are required.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: demonstrate skill of gaining and applying learned material in a field experience.

    GEOG 394 Field Studies in Geography: Volcanic Landscapes

    Units: 1 - 4

    Hours: 6 - 24 hours LEC; 36 - 144 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU

    This course involves the study of geographic principles and processes in volcanic environments. The course content will vary by destination but may include topics in physical geography (e.g., plant and animal communities, climate and weather, geology and geomorphology, natural hazards, environmental impacts, etc.), human geography (e.g., cultural landscapes, economic activities, transportation issues, land use patterns, etc.), and introduction to tools and techniques used for geographic field research (e.g., map and compass use, the Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), etc.). Field excursions are required.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO 1: demonstrate skills of gaining and applying learned material in a field experience.

    GEOG 481 Honors Seminars: Nature & Culture

    Units: 3

    Same As: HONOR 382 and HUM 484

    Hours: 54 hours LEC

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU; UC

    This seminar examines multicultural interpretations and use of the environment from the Native American era to modern day using various geographic regions as case studies. Interdisciplinary in approach, this course draws upon the natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences to explain how the physical environment has been interpreted,
    utilized, and impacted differently by various cultures through time. Two field trips are required as part of this seminar. This course is intended for academically-accomplished students, regardless of major. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course is the same as HONOR 382 and HUM 484, and only one may be taken for credit.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1, College Wide SLO – Area 1, and General Education SLO C5a – English Composition). This includes the ability to:

    GEOG 482 Honors Seminar in Geography

    Units: 1

    Same As: HONOR 384

    Hours: 9 hours LEC; 27 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU

    Honors Seminars in Geography are special one-unit intensive courses for academically accomplished students or those with the potential for high academic achievement. In these seminars, students will study advanced topics from the area of Geography. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course
    is the same as HONOR 384.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1, College Wide SLO – Area 1, and General Education SLO C5a – English Composition). This includes the ability to:

    GEOG 495 Independent Studies in Geography

    Units: 1 - 3

    Hours: 54 - 162 hours LAB

    Prerequisite: None.

    Transferable: CSU

    An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study.

    Full-time Faculty

    Scott Crosier.
    Scott Crosier
    Office: SCI 114
    Phone: (916) 691-7164
    E-mail: CrosieS@crc.losrios.edu
    Debra Sharkey.
    Debra Sharkey
    Office: SCI 112
    Phone: (916) 691-7210
    E-mail: sharked@crc.losrios.edu

    Adjunct Faculty

    Keir Keightley
    John Knettle
    Jennifer McHenry
    Curtis Robinson
    John Rusmore

    Geography is the science of place and space. Geographers study the relationships among geographic places, natural systems, society, cultural activities, and the interdependence of all these over space.