Catalog 2019-20

Physics and Astronomy

Associate Degrees for Transfer

A.S.-T. in Physics

The Associate in Science in Physics for Transfer degree provides students with a thorough overview of the field of physics. Students will have demonstrated sufficient understanding in the fields of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, mechanical and electromagnetic waves, modern physics, the scientific method and mathematics to successfully transfer to a four-year institution with a major in physics.

The Associate in Science in Physics for Transfer degree fulfills the general requirements of the California State University for transfer. Students with this degree will receive priority admission with junior status to the California State University system, although not necessarily to a particular campus or major.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids 4
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism 4
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics 4
MATH 400 Calculus I 5
MATH 401 Calculus II 5
MATH 402 Calculus III 5
Total Units: 27

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

explain the scientific method and its application to the fundamental concepts of physics including mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, mechanical and electromagnetic waves, optics and modern physics.

solve conceptual, numeric and symbolic problems in physics (specifically the fields of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, mechanical and electromagnetic waves, optics and modern physics) using mathematics through calculus.

demonstrate the proper use of basic laboratory devices including metersticks, balances, digital multimeters, and oscilloscopes.

apply mathematical concepts including single and multivariable calculus, vector calculus, and basic differential equations in order to model physical systems and solve physical problems.

create graphical representations of data and analyze those graphs to determine the results of laboratory activities.

write a clear, coherent and thorough lab report.

Career Information

This degree is designed to facilitate successful transfer to four-year programs that prepare students for advanced study in physics and related fields including biophysics, physical chemistry, geophysics, and astrophysics. Physicists with undergraduate and graduate degrees have a wide range of employment opportunities including research, engineering, computer programming, and teaching.

NOTE TO TRANSFER STUDENTS:
The Associate Degree for Transfer program is designed for students who plan to transfer to a campus of the California State University (CSU). Other than the required core, the courses you choose to complete this degree will depend to some extent on the selected CSU for transfer. In addition, some CSU-GE Breadth or IGETC requirements can also be completed using courses required for this associate degree for transfer major (known as “double-counting”). Meeting with a counselor to determine the most appropriate course choices will facilitate efficient completion of your transfer requirements. For students wishing to transfer to other universities (UC System, private, or out-of-state), the Associate Degree for Transfer may not provide adequate preparation for upper-division transfer admissions, because many universities require more lower division courses than those in this degree. Even the CSU's that accept this transfer degree may likely require more lower division courses to achieve the Bachelor degree. Specifically, courses in general chemistry, differential equations, linear algebra, and computer programming may better prepare the transfer student for certain universities. It is critical that you meet with a CRC counselor to select and plan the courses for the major, as programs vary widely in terms of the required preparation.

Associate Degrees

A.S. in General Science

Areas of Study include:

  • Physical Anthropology
  • Astronomy
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Engineering
  • Physical Geography
  • Geology
  • Physics

Eighteen (18) units of transfer level course work in science is required. Two laboratory courses must be included: one in the physical sciences and one in the biological sciences. Courses may be selected from astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, physical geography, physical anthropology, and physics. The student, in consultation with a counselor, should choose science courses to meet his or her program, transfer, or general education requirements.

Students interested in transferring to a four-year university with a science major are encouraged to complete a science AS or AS-T degree such as Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Geography, Geology, or Physics. This General Science degree may not include the majors-level transfer courses needed for many science majors. Students are strongly recommended to see a counselor for guidance.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
A. Life Science with Lab:
A minimum of 4 units from the following: 4
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology  (3)
  and ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory  (1)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms  (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology  (4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology  (5)
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany  (5)
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology  (5)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 440 General Microbiology  (4)
B. Physical Science with Lab:
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory  (1)
  and ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy  (3)
CHEM 300 Beginning Chemistry  (4)
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 306 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  (1)
  and CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry  (3)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II  (5)
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II  (5)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems  (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOL 305 Earth Science  (3)
GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOL 310 Historical Geology  (3)
ENGR 304 How Things Work  (3)
PHYS 350 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 360 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics  (5)
PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics  (5)
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids  (4)
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism  (4)
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics  (4)
C. Additional Science Courses:
A minimum of 11 units from the following: 111
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology  (3)
ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory  (1)
ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy  (3)
ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory  (1)
BIOL 300 The Foundations of Biology  (3)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms  (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology  (4)
BIOL 342 The New Plagues: New and Ancient Infectious Diseases Threatening World Health  (3)
BIOL 350 Environmental Biology  (3)
BIOL 352 Conservation Biology  (3)
BIOL 390 Natural History Field Study  (0.5 - 4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology  (5)
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany  (5)
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology  (5)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 440 General Microbiology  (4)
BIOL 462 Genetics in Contemporary Human Society  (3)
CHEM 300 Beginning Chemistry  (4)
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 306 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry  (3)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  (1)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II  (5)
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II  (5)
ENGR 304 How Things Work  (3)
GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems  (3)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory  (1)
GEOG 305 Global Climate Change  (3)
GEOG 306 Weather and Climate  (3)
GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 305 Earth Science  (3)
GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 310 Historical Geology  (3)
GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 330 Introduction to Oceanography  (3)
GEOL 390 Field Studies in Geology  (1 - 4)
PHYS 310 Conceptual Physics  (3)
PHYS 350 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 360 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics  (5)
PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics  (5)
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids  (4)
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism  (4)
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics  (4)
Total Units: 18

1Courses used in A or B above will not count towards C, except units exceeding the 4 or 3 unit minimum in A and B. For example, a student completing the 5 unit CHEM 309 under B could apply 2 of those units towards C. A total of 18 science units is required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

explain the core perspectives of the scientific method and apply it to at least one scientific discipline. (SLO 1)

solve introductory problems of a conceptual and/or numerical nature of at least one scientific discipline. (SLO 2)

accurately apply the basic vocabulary and concepts of at least one scientific discipline verbally and in writing. (SLO 3)

recognize the use and misuse of scientific concepts in society including politics and the media. (SLO 4)

A.S. in Physics

The Associate in Science in Physics degree provides students with a thorough overview of the field of physics. Students will have demonstrated sufficient understanding in the fields of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, mechanical and electromagnetic waves, modern physics, the scientific method, mathematics and chemistry to successfully transfer to a four-year institution with a major in physics.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I 5
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II 5
MATH 400 Calculus I 5
MATH 401 Calculus II 5
MATH 402 Calculus III 5
MATH 420 Differential Equations 4
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids 4
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism 4
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics 4
Total Units: 41

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

explain the scientific method and its application to the fundamental concepts of physics including mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, mechanical and electromagnetic waves, optics, modern physics and general chemistry.

solve conceptual, numeric and symbolic problems in physics (mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, mechanical and electromagnetic waves, optics and modern physics) and general chemistry using mathematics through calculus.

demonstrate the proper use of basic laboratory devices including metersticks, balances, digital multimeters, and oscilloscopes.

apply mathematical concepts including algebra, single and multivariable calculus, vector calculus, and basic differential equations in order to model physical systems and solve physical problems.

create graphical representations of data and analyze those graphs to determine the results of laboratory activities.

write a clear, coherent and thorough lab report.

Career Information

This degree is designed to facilitate successful transfer to four-year programs that prepare students for advanced study in physics and related fields including biophysics, physical chemistry, geophysics, and astrophysics. Physicists with undergraduate and graduate degrees have a wide range of employment opportunities including research, engineering, computer programming, and teaching.

NOTE TO TRANSFER STUDENTS:
It is critical that you meet with a CRC counselor to select and plan the courses for the major, as university physics programs vary widely in terms of the required preparation. Specifically, some programs may require courses in linear algebra and computer programming as well as the courses included in this degree.

Astronomy (ASTR) Courses

ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course is a descriptive course in general astronomy treating the nature and evolution of the solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology and life in the universe.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF EARLY ASTRONOMY AND CELESTIAL MOTION (SLO 1, PSLO 2).

ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory

Units: 1

Hours: 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Corequisite: ASTR 300

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course covers topics including constellations, star charts, and motions of the Earth, Moon and other astronomical bodies. Students will apply the techniques that astronomers use to study the Earth, Moon, Sun, planets and stars. The course includes observations with the naked eye, binoculars and/or telescopes.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

IDENTIFY AND CLASSIFY COMMON CELESTIAL OBJECTS. (SLO 1)

ASTR 495 Independent Studies in Astronomy

Units: 1 - 3

Hours: 54 - 162 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).

ASTR 498 Work Experience in Astronomy

Units: 1 - 4

Hours: 60 - 300 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Enrollment Limitation:

Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position or job related to career goals in Astronomy.

Transferable: CSU

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment in their major field of study or advancement within their career. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce; completion of required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. Appropriate level learning objectives are established by the student and the employer. During the semester, the student is required to participate in a weekly orientation and 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. Work Experience may be taken for a total of 16 units when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING AND APPLICATION OF PROFESSIONAL WORKPLACE BEHAVIOR IN A FIELD OF STUDY RELATED ONE’S CAREER.(SLO 1)

Physics (PHYS) Courses

PHYS 310 Conceptual Physics

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: MATH 100 or 102, or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC (1) PHYS 310 and 311 combined: maximum transfer credit of one course; 2) No credit for PHYS 310 or 311 if taken after PHYS 350, 360, 370, 380, 411, 421 or 431)

This course provides a conceptual overview of Newtonian and modern physics for non-science and science students alike. The conceptual approach to physics is tied to the student's personal experience in the everyday world, so that the student learns to see physics not as just a classroom or laboratory activity, but as a part of his or her surroundings. The class is open to students with no previous physics background.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: EXPLAIN THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD AND HOW SCIENTISTS APPLY IT TO UNDERSTANDING NATURE.

PHYS 350 General Physics

Units: 4

Hours: 54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: MATH 335 with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC (PHYS 350, 360, 370, 380, 411, 421, 431 combined: maximum transfer credit of one series*; deduct credit for duplication of topics)

CID: C-ID PHYS 105; Part of C-ID PHYS 100S

This course, the first semester of General Physics, is a transferable course required for many life science and other majors and may also be taken for general education credit. Materials covered will include classical mechanics (including kinematics, statics, dynamics, Newton's Laws, energy and momentum conservation, rigid body motion and oscillatory motion), fluid mechanics, mechanical waves (including sound), and thermodynamics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

APPLY APPROPRIATELY NEWTON’S LAWS OF MOTION TO MECHANICAL SYSTEMS, DEVELOP AND ARTICULATE A NEWTONIAN WORLDVIEW (SLO 1; PSLO 2, 4)

PHYS 360 General Physics

Units: 4

Hours: 54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: PHYS 350 with a grade of "C" or better

Transferable: CSU; UC (PHYS 350, 360, 370, 380, 411, 421, 431 combined: maximum transfer credit of one series*; deduct credit for duplication of topics)

CID: C-ID PHYS 110; Part of C-ID PHYS 100S

This course, the second semester of General Physics, is a transferable course required for many life science and other students. Material covered will include classical electricity and magnetism (electrostatics, electric fields and potentials, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction and electromagnetic radiation), DC and AC circuits, light, geometric and wave optics, special relativity, atomic structure, quantum physics and nuclear physics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1 – EVALUATE A PHYSICAL SYSTEM FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERACTIONS, PROPERLY APPLY THE LAWS OF ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM TO PHYSICAL SYSTEMS, AND INTEGRATE THIS INTO A NEWTONIAN VISION OF THE UNIVERSE.

PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics

Units: 5

Hours: 72 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: MATH 350 with a grade of "C" or better

Transferable: CSU; UC (PHYS 350, 360, 370, 380, 411, 421, 431 combined: maximum transfer credit of one series*; deduct credit for duplication of topics)

CID: C-ID PHYS 105; Part of C-ID PHYS 100S

This course, the first semester of the Introductory Physics sequence, is designed for students transferring to programs which require two semesters of calculus-based physics such as some life science and architecture programs. Material covered will include classical mechanics (kinematics, statics, dynamics, Newton's Laws, work, conservation of mechanical energy and momentum, rotations and oscillations), fluid mechanics, mechanical waves including sound, and thermodynamics. Basic calculus skills will be assumed in the derivation and application of physical principles.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1 – develop and articulate a Newtonian worldview. The student will appropriately apply Newton’s Laws of motion to mechanical systems, will recognize prior misconceptions about the mechanical universe and replace them with correct concepts.

PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics

Units: 5

Hours: 72 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: PHYS 370 with a grade of "C" or better

Transferable: CSU; UC (PHYS 350, 360, 370, 380, 411, 421, 431 combined: maximum transfer credit of one series*; deduct credit for duplication of topics)

CID: C-ID PHYS 110; Part of C-ID PHYS 100S

This course, the second semester of the Introductory Physics sequence, is designed for students transferring to programs which require two semesters of calculus-based physics such as some life science and architecture programs. Material covered will include electrostatics, electrical circuits and devices, magnetism, light, and modern physics (including special relativity, quantum, atomic and nuclear physics). Basic calculus skills will be assumed in the derivation and application of physical principles.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1 – evaluate a physical system for electromagnetic interactions, properly apply the laws of electricity and magnetism to physical systems, and integrate this into a Newtonian vision of the universe.

PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids

Units: 4

Hours: 54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: MATH 400 with a grade of "C" or better

Transferable: CSU; UC (PHYS 350, 360, 370, 380, 411, 421, 431 combined: maximum transfer credit of one series*; deduct credit for duplication of topics)

CID: C-ID PHYS 205; Part of C-ID PHYS 200S

The course examines the fundamentals of mechanics: vectors, kinematics, Newton's laws of motion, work, energy, momentum, conservation principles, oscillations, fluids, and gravitation. This course is recommended for students studying the Physical Sciences, Engineering, and Computer Information Science, as well as some students studying Architecture or Mathematics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

DEVELOP AND ARTICULATE A NEWTONIAN WORLDVIEW AND APPROPRIATELY APPLY NEWTON’S LAWS OF MOTION TO MECHANICAL SYSTEMS. (SLO 1, PSLO 2)

PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism

Units: 4

Hours: 54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: MATH 401 and PHYS 411 with grades of "C" or better

Transferable: CSU; UC (PHYS 350, 360, 370, 380, 411, 421, 431 combined: maximum transfer credit of one series*; deduct credit for duplication of topics)

CID: C-ID PHYS 210; Part of C-ID PHYS 200S

This course examines the fundamentals of electricity and magnetism: electric and magnetic fields and forces, electric potentials, capacitors and dielectrics, DC and AC circuits, inductance, magnetic materials, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, and the operation of general electrical circuit measuring devices including multimeters and oscilloscopes. This is the second course (although Physics 421 and 431 may be taken in either order) of the calculus-based physics sequence for physical science, engineering, computer science and other majors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO#1--DEVELOP AND ARTICULATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF ELECTROMAGNETIC SYSTEMS AND IN SOME CASES HOW THEY INTEGRATE INTO A NEWTONIAN WORLDVIEW.

PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics

Units: 4

Hours: 54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: MATH 401 and PHYS 411 with grades of "C" or better

Transferable: CSU; UC (PHYS 350, 360, 370, 380, 411, 421, 431 combined: maximum transfer credit of one series*; deduct credit for duplication of topics)

CID: C-ID PHYS 215; Part of C-ID PHYS 200S

This course examines the fundamentals of thermodynamics, waves and modern physics. Topics include temperature, heat, kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics, mechanical waves, sound, light reflection and refraction, interference and diffraction, optics, lasers, special relativity, quantum physics, atomic physics, nuclear physics, and particle physics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO#1--DEVELOP AND ARTICULATE A BASIC UNDERSTANDING OF THERMODYNAMIC SYSTEMS, WAVE PROPERTIES, SOUND, REFLECTION AND REFRACTION OF LIGHT, GEOMETRICAL OPTICS AND MODERN PHYSICS THAT INCLUDES RELATIVITY, QUANTUM PHYSICS, AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS.

PHYS 495 Independent Studies in Physics

Units: 1 - 3

Hours: 54 - 162 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).

PHYS 498 Work Experience in Physics

Units: 1 - 4

Hours: 60 - 300 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Enrollment Limitation:

Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position or job related to career goals in Physics.

Transferable: CSU

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment in their major field of study or advancement within their career. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce; completion of required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. Appropriate level learning objectives are established by the student and the employer. During the semester, the student is required to participate in a weekly orientation and 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. Work Experience may be taken for a total of 16 units when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING AND APPLICATION OF PROFESSIONAL WORKPLACE BEHAVIOR IN A FIELD OF STUDY RELATED ONE’S CAREER.(SLO 1)

The CRC PHYSICS department offers a full array of transferable courses that fulfill both major and general education requirements. Physics sequences include a three-semester calculus-based sequence for computer science and engineering students, a two-semester calculus-based sequence for life science and architecture students, and a two-semester trigonometry-based sequence for life science and architecture students.