Catalog 2019-20

Sociology

Associate Degree for Transfer

A.A.-T. in Sociology

Cosumnes River College Sociology Associate in Arts for Transfer Program is designed to facilitate successful transfer to baccalaureate sociology degree programs. This degree provides students with the lower division breadth and depth of the field of sociology. Additionally, this degree exposes students to the core principles and practices in the field. Students will learn to: identify and comprehend their individual relationship to structures in the larger society; apply effective critical thinking skills to interpret sociological phenomena; assess the significance of important social movements in American society; define and identify various theoretical perspectives across the discipline of sociology; and analyze, interpret, and critically think about sociological ascriptions to race, gender, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, political affiliation, and other sociological concepts.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
SOC 300 Introductory Sociology 3
SOC 301 Social Problems 3
SOC 302 Introduction to Social Research Methods 3
PSYC 330 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences  (3) 3 - 4
  or STAT 300 Introduction to Probability and Statistics  (4)
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
SOC 305 Critical Thinking in the Social Sciences  (3)
SOC 310 Marriage and the Family  (3)
SOC 321 Race, Ethnicity and Inequality in the United States  (3)
SOC 341 Sex and Gender in the U.S.  (3)
Total Units: 18 - 19

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

(PSLO1) Identify and comprehend their individual relationship to structures in the larger society.

Individuals will comprehend the magnitude of their influence on social structures in society, and the social structures that influence them.

Demonstrate an awareness of the sociological resources available within the structures of society.

Effectively utilize social structures as resources in society to facilitate their own movement and/or progress in society.

(PSLO2) Apply effective critical thinking skills to interpret sociological phenomena.

Apply sociological approaches to assess a social context.

Distinguish between macro-level and micro-level orientations of assessment of given social contexts.

Investigate and determine which social contexts require objective or subjective analysis.

(PSLO3) Assess the significance of important social movements in American society.

Demonstrate an awareness of the consistent goals, perspectives, and factors leading to social movements.

Assess the significance of social movements of marginalized people in society.

Explain the outcomes of social movements in American society.

(PSLO4) Define and identify various theoretical perspectives across the discipline of Sociology.

Discuss and Explain Social Conflict Approach.

Discuss and Explain Symbolic Interactionist Approach.

Discuss and Explain Structural Functionalist Approach.

(PSLO5) Comprehend how social practices facilitate the functioning of social structures as they are responsible for maintaining the society as a whole.

Examine and assess the effects of sociocultural customs and traditions on social structures and institutions.

Analyze and evaluate values and norms present in the behavior of individuals and groups occupying society’s social structures and institutions.

Investigate the relationship between religion, language, customs and traditions, and how they facilitate comprehension of values and influence social practices.

(PSLO6) Analyze, interpret, and critically think about sociological ascriptions to race, gender, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, political affiliation, and other sociological concepts.

Discuss and explain how ascriptions to sociological concepts affects and shapes individuals and groups’ life chances and opportunities.

Demonstrate content knowledge of how and why particular ideas are ascribed to sociological concepts.

Explain and assess the socialization that individuals and groups undergo due to ideas ascribed to sociological concepts.

Career Information

Sociologists with advanced degrees and professional certificates have a broad range of employment opportunities including, but not limited to, teacher, social worker, probation officer, employment counselor, urban planner, and data analyst. NOTE TO TRANSFER STUDENTS: The Associate Degree for Transfer program is designed for students who plan to transfer to a campus of the California State University (CSU). Other than the required core, the courses you choose to complete this degree will depend to some extent on the selected CSU for transfer. In addition, some CSU-GE Breadth or IGETC requirements can also be completed using courses required for this associate degree for transfer major (known as "double-counting"). The Associate Degree for Transfer may not provide adequate preparation for upper-division transfer admissions; it is critical that you meet with a CRC counselor to select and plan the courses for the major, as programs vary widely in terms of the required preparation.

Sociology

SOC 300 Introductory Sociology

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID SOCI 110

This course is a study of human behavior in society, including social groups, culture, personality, social stratification, social change, collective behavior and social institutions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO1: Develop the ability to analyze everyday experience from a sociological perspective.

SOC 301 Social Problems

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID SOCI 115

This course is a survey of social problems in American society. It will examine their causes and evaluate proposed solutions. A special emphasis will be placed on local issues.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO1: Demonstrate an ability to analyze contemporary social problems which exists in society.

SOC 302 Introduction to Social Research Methods

Units: 3

Hours: 36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: SOC 300 with a grade of "C" or better

Advisory: ENGWR 300 (College Composition) or ESLW 340 and STAT 300 with grades of "C" or better

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID SOCI 120

This course examines theoretical and ethical principles in social science research with an applied emphasis on research design, utilization of qualitative and quantitative techniques, data coding, data cleaning and organization, descriptive and inferential analysis, and the writing of research reports. Students will be introduced to the application of statistical software for quantitative areas of course work.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO1: Develop the ability to analyze and apply scientific research methods from a sociological perspective.

SOC 305 Critical Thinking in the Social Sciences

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: ENGWR 300 or the equivalent

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course examines the definitional and contextual nature of social issues. It develops a "critical thinking" approach which integrates interdisciplinary principles and incorporates a comparative framework utilizing literary criticism, logic, argumentation, and persuasion to analyze and compare the content and validity of social problems. This course specifically explores how the media and scientific community collect, interpret, and report social data. Combining critical thinking techniques with the sociological perspective will help students to question the "taken-for-granted" assumptions that surround social phenomena and influence human behavior.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

Demonstrate an ability to identify and apply the principles and logic of social science research methods (SLO1).

SOC 310 Marriage and the Family

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID SOCI 130

This course will examine the social, psychological, cross-cultural, political, historical and economic factors relating to the changing family, marriage, remarriage and significant relationships. The intersection of race, ethnicity, class, age, gender, and sexuality will be explored.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO 1: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES RELATING TO THE SOCIAL INSTITUTION OF THE FAMILY.

SOC 321 Race, Ethnicity and Inequality in the United States

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID SOCI 150

This course is a social profile of major American minority groups. It examines the problems of minority assimilation into an "open" society and culture.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO 1: Explain how an individual's race or ethnicity can affect the quality of their interactions in social structures throughout the larger society.

SOC 341 Sex and Gender in the U.S.

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID SOCI 140

This course provides a study of the changing roles of women and men in the US. Theories of women's and men's gender role socialization, gender related inequalities, health and body issues, and a current examination of the women's and men's movements will be explored.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO 1: Articulate the general principles of biological, psychological, anthropological, and sociological theories to the study of sex and gender.

SOC 495 Independent Studies in Sociology

Units: 1 - 3

Hours: 54 - 162 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).

Full-time Faculty

George Nyenbeku.
Nyenbeku George
Office: BS 117
Phone: (916) 691-7536
E-mail: georgen@crc.losrios.edu
Donnisha Lugo
Office: SOC 137
Phone: (916) 691-(916) 691-7901
E-mail: LugoD@crc.losrios.edu
Thien-Huong Ninh
Office: BS 118
Phone: (916) 691-7363
E-mail: NinhT@crc.losrios.edu
https://www.crc.losrios.edu/facstaff/sites/Ninh
Paul Zisk
Office: SOC 138
Phone: (916) 691-7230
E-mail: ziskp@crc.losrios.edu

Adjunct Faculty

Rachael Browne
Tyler Elston
Jason Logan
Dameon Nguyen

CRC offers courses and a degree in the study of human behavior in society. The discipline is concerned with the study of systems and how individuals work and interact within them.